Confederation of European Paper Industries
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Who is CEPI?

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI)

is a Brussels-based non-profit making organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing this industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Its collective expertise provides a unique source of information both for and on the industry; coordinating essential exchanges of experience and knowledge among its members, the ability to provide technical assistance to legislators and to identify independent experts on specific issues. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 520 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 950 paper mills. Together they represent 24% of world production.

Highlights

2013 CEPI Sustainability report

Key messages and graphs are available for use. Read it here.

 

Save the date!

European Paper Week 2014: 25-27 November 2014

 

European Paper Week video wins Applied Arts Design Awards 2013

The teaser video made for European Paper Week won the first prize in the category Motion Design of the Canadian magazine AppliedArts!

 

Paper industry is part of the bioeconomy

Great introduction to the bioeconomy in this European Commission video.
 

 

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BASTA! Enough is enough – the EU needs to get back on track!

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Press Release | 27 Jan.2014

BASTA! Enough is enough – the EU needs to get back on track!

European industry unveils campaign in support of Europe’s economic recovery

Following the release of the Industrial Renaissance Communication, CEPI (the Confederation of European Paper Industries) launched today a campaign calling for the EU to put the manufacturing industry at the heart of the European economy. “Basta! Get back on track!” calls for the EU to reduce red tape, help win the global competitiveness race, rethink existing policies and put the focus back on industry.

It intends to show how Industrial Renaissance can be put into practice. To make Europe a better place for manufacturing means creating a legislative environment in which European manufacturers can compete on a level playing field with other manufacturers throughout the world. By ensuring legislation is appropriate, affordable and consistent. Demonstrating where European policy has gone wrong, the Basta! campaign will also highlight where EU policy has been well-implemented to support industry on a national level.

Four elements are part of this campaign:

1. Reduce red tape
The EU managed to create a staggering 2,314 new regulations and directives in 5 years, while producing 700 measures to reduce the amount of red tape that was created.

2. Help win the global competitiveness race
Europe is competing with regions that have lower taxes, lower wages and less strict legislation. The Commission must balance the playing field for European businesses.

3. Rethink existing policies
There is a considerable price gap between the costs for energy in Europe and those in the rest of the world. Words have to be put into practice now to create a level playing field on which European businesses can compete.

4. Focus back on industry
The European Commission needs to bring an industrial competitiveness dimension into EU policies at an early stage and keep in mind the importance of the value chain in manufacturing. Incentivising resource efficiency and innovation and allowing companies to choose their own methods for doing this instead of micromanaging will be more successful, according to CEPI.


Mrs Presas explained: “The Basta! messages are meant for the current Commission and the next one. The campaign seeks to make the Industrial Renaissance more concrete.”


Other industry sectors are invited to join CEPI and several have announced their interest in supporting the campaign, which will run throughout 2014.


For more information, please contact Daniela Haiduc at d.haiduc@cepi.org, mobile: +32(0)473562936


Note to the Editor

BASTA campaign page: www.getbackontrack.info

Twitter: https://twitter.com/BastaCampaign

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bastagetbackontrack

Youtube channel and video: http://www.youtube.com/user/bastacampaign

Industrial Renaissance Communication: http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/initiatives/mission-growth/index_en.htm

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Press Release | 24 Jan.2014

Focus is back on industry in EU policy, but will it work?

The fact that the 2030 Energy and Climate package includes an analysis of energy costs and was published together with the European Industrial Renaissance Communication is a landmark shift in EU policy. The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) interprets this as a signal showing the European Commission is starting to take industrial competitiveness seriously. However, there are still important steps to be taken.

In practice, this new package will not change the competitiveness of industry in the short run. The high pile of documents released by the Commission analyses and promises, but at the end it only proposes one legal act – the change of the EU ETS. In this regard, CEPI welcomes the Commission proposal to keep EU ETS unchanged up to 2020 to give the necessary stability for investments in EU industry. But is this enough?

The Commission finally acknowledged energy prices in Europe are uncompetitive, as electricity costs for industry are twice that of US competitors. It also rightfully recognised the way the EU supported renewable energy was unsustainable. It is now up to EU member states to change this. But more is needed. The gas market needs to be reformed. Energy interconnections between EU member states need to increase urgently.

The impact on European competitiveness of a 40% CO2 reduction target by 2030 for the entire EU economy cannot be underestimated either. The suggested changes by the Commission for industrial sectors will require emission reductions of 43% in 2030, 65% in 2040 and 87% in 2050. The European Council in March needs to assess the feasibility of this package in detail and develop tools that support the deployment of innovative low-carbon solutions in industry. This is especially needed, if no further global action is taken and the EU Economy does not improve.

Additionally, the cost of decarbonising the current power sector - a key challenge - is not addressed. This will most likely increase electricity bills, which the European Commission accepted as being too high already. The EU will have to explore new models of decarbonising the power sector, other than via the carbon price alone.

Specifically related to the European pulp and paper industry, CEPI applauds the long awaited recognition of the negative impact of subsidised bioenergy on EU wood markets. And CEPI welcomes the announcement in the 2030 Energy and Climate package to further explore funding tools for breakthrough technologies.

But the bottom line is: policy needs to be put into practice. “We appreciate the refocus on industrial policy. It is a good sign that the Commission recognises again our role in creating jobs and growth for Europe. However, the proposed measures for an effective industrial policy need to be translated into concrete actions as soon as possible”, said Teresa Presas, CEPI Director General.


For more information, please contact Daniela Haiduc at d.haiduc@cepi.org, mobile: +32(0)473562936


Note to the Editor

2030 Energy and Climate Package from the European Commission:
http://ec.europa.eu/energy/2030_en.htm

Industrial renaissance Communication:
http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/initiatives/mission-growth/index_en.htm

 

 

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Position paper | 21 Mar.2014

Customer Requests: CEPI recommends use of harmonised disclaimers for voluntary declarations in the European pulp and paper industry

Companies are experiencing, in their daily customer contacts, requests for various declarations, frequently related to non-relevant topics and often totally misplaced. Answering such requests can cause misunderstandings with customers.

In order to help companies give responsible and harmonised answers to their customers CEPI recommends a set of standard disclaimers (see annex), to be routinely used depending on the type of request and on the individual discretion of each company. These disclaimers are recommended to be used routinely when signing declarations in reply to those requests, by inserting them in the declaration document. Using the same disclaimers across the pulp and paper industry will reduce the pressure of making unsubstantiated declarations and reduce reputation risks as well as the risk of possible financial claims for individual companies and the sector as a whole.

i. These disclaimers are not intended to be used when such declarations of compliance are mandatory (required by law). These shall be prepared and issued mandatorily, following the forms and ways of releasing them as the legislation requires.

ii. These disclaimers are intended to be used for voluntary declarations regarding statements attesting to the compliance with specific legislation or with qualitative and technical adaptations to non-binding technical standards. For such requests for voluntary declarations, three standard disclaimers are recommended by CEPI:

a. Issuing a declaration on the absence of certain substances
b. Refusing a declaration of compliance with non-relevant legislation
c. Issuing a declaration of compliance with non-relevant legislation

For more information, please contact Jori Ringman, at j.ringman@cepi.org, telephone n°: +32 47825 50 70

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Additional information

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 520 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 950 paper mills. Together they represent 24% of world production.

Website: http://www.cepi.org/ mail@cepi.org

Annex : Disclaimers

1. Requests that may be relevant to our sector, but which are made in a form that is neither in line with legislation nor with scientific common sense. The most frequent case to be considered is a request to declare the “absence” of certain chemicals, whilst the applicable legislation sets a specific limit or no limits are set at all. The voluntary release of such declarations should be accompanied by the following disclaimer:

With reference to the present declaration, ‘absence’ means that the final product may contain substances that were in the incoming raw materials as traces or impurities and were not intentionally added during the pulp and papermaking process.

2. Requests related to declarations that are totally irrelevant to our sector1.
In case the company decides not to release any declarations, the following disclaimer should be used:

The declaration that has been requested cannot be released, as it concerns2 [(for example) the restrictions on the content of the chemicals listed in the Directive 2002/95/EC, the so called ‘RoHS directive’, on the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment.]
This legislation is not applicable to pulp and paper products.

3. In case the company nevertheless decides to voluntarily release a declaration where the request is related to legislation or standards that are not relevant to pulp and paper, the voluntary release of such declarations should be accompanied by the following disclaimer:

Where the present declaration refers to legislation or a standard in which this product is not included in the scope, ‘compliance’ means a declaration of intent by the manufacturer, whereas there are no legal means to formally comply due to the limitations set by the scope of the referred legislation or standard. ‘Absence’ means the final product may contain substances that were in incoming raw materials as traces or impurities and were not intentionally added during the pulp and papermaking process.


* * *
1A typical example is the declaration on the compliance with the restrictions on the chemicals listed in Directive 2002/95/EC (RoHS Directive) regarding the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment. Naturally, such declarations are mandatory in special cases where the product is used for electronic applications.
2Insert the reference and scope of the legislation or standard relevant to the request.

 

The disclaimer has been translated into Spanish by our member Aspapel. Read it here
 

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Position paper | 17 Mar.2014

The paper sector social dialogue calls for boosting the re-industrialisation of the EU

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) representing the employers in the paper industry and industriAll European Trade Union, representing 7.1 million workers across supply chains in manufacturing, mining and energy sectors are the Social Partners in the European Social Dialogue Committee for the paper sector.


In the current context of economic crisis, characterized by the decline of the manufacturing sectors, CEPI and industriAll Europe take note with great concern of the overall loss of competitiveness of the European manufacturing industries, which leads to capacity closures and job losses.
CEPI and industriAll Europe welcome the European industrial policy and its ambition to increase the contribution of the industries to 20% of the GDP by 2020. However, CEPI and industriAll believe it needs to go further in redressing the competitiveness of the manufacturing sectors.
The goal of a European industrial policy should be holistic and be directed towards safeguarding and even developing industrial activities and creating stable high quality employment while increasing efficiency and sustainability in the process, taking into account the more general objective of sustainable development.


However, high energy and raw material prices are undermining industrial growth in Europe, while our industry faces fierce competition from regions of the world where energy costs are much lower than in Europe.


Therefore, CEPI and industriAll Europe urge the European Institutions to establish the enabling and predictable conditions needed to fulfill the ambition to increase industry’s share of GDP by 20%. They ask the EU Institutions:


• To allow the industry time for adaptation, and to reduce the regulatory risks for companies, in light of the some 130 ambitious environmental targets the EU intends to achieve between 2010 and 2050.


• To carefully balance new targets in the field of climate change with considerations of increasing the competiveness of its industry and ensuring the security of energy supply with view on the absence of similar commitments from the EU main trade partners. It would be incoherent and suicidal to impose constraints on our industry while importing products that do not meet the same constraints. For the paper sector, the renewable energy policies subsidizing the use of biomass wood for burning are putting at risk the sustainable and cost-effective availability of raw materials.


• To improve the coordination of forthcoming policies and legislations – including the social ones - and shift the policy work to better and coherent regulation. As an example, the publication of a non legally-binding guidance note to clarify the implementation of the EU Timber Regulation leads in reality to a substantial modification the Regulation itself. Hence it may create legal uncertainty and additional burden for the European operators.


• To promote fair and balanced terms, including in energy, environmental and social terms, when negotiating trade agreements, which otherwise could negatively impact the competitiveness of the domestic industries.


• To further promote the Commission’s initiatives aiming at assessing the environmental regulatory layers (e.g. Cumulative Cost Assessment) and thus to create stable and enabling conditions for the European manufacturing sector keeping in mind its vision to enhance growth, safe and healthy jobs and competitiveness.


• To secure sufficient support, notably from the EU budget, for research and innovation as well as in training and qualifications of the workforce that can benefit the manufacturing industries of Europe.


At a time where the paper sector social partners are concerned about the difficulties to attract young people to work in the manufacturing industries – in particular as young people mostly see capacity closures in the EU and relocations -, only a strong and ambitious industrial policy with concrete measures benefitting all the industrial branches can reverse the trend and create the conditions for investments within the European Union.


The EU paper sector social dialogue brings together the paper workers and employers from the EU member States, represented by IndustriAll European Trade Union and CEPI.


Major challenges to the sector include falling demand for certain products and the shift towards CO2-neutral production. The move to more efficient use of raw materials and the contribution to a low-carbon economy within a forest-fibre industry combining pulp, paper and wood-based products will lead to a demand for new skills and qualifications and a need to (re-)train the workforce. The Committee is currently focusing on:


• health and safety
• skills and qualifications
• demographic change
• resources and raw material policies.


www.cepi.org
www.industriall-europe.eu

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news | 27 Mar.2014

CEPI receives two-star 'Ecodynamic company' label

The Brussels regional energy and environment agency renewed CEPI's two-star 'Ecodynamic company' label. This award is delivered to Brussels-based associations and companies with high environmental quality standards. 

We are very proud to have received this honour. A big thank you to the staff members who worked on the application and helped obtain the label. Here it is!

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news | 12 Mar.2014

CEPI at the Innovation Convention 2014

CEPI had a stand at the European Commission's Innovation Convention next to Google glass and Microsoft!

Our stand was focused on Deep Eutectic Solvents, the winner of the Two Team Project. As you can in this photo, it was a big success. It gathered interest from participants with different profiles, ranging from European Commission employees to students, companies and scientists.

We would like to thank Sappi for providing the material for the stand as well as Eindhoven university for sending a PhD student who did an excellent job explaining the technical side of DES.

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CEPI staff members explaining Deep Eutectic Solvents and the Two Team Project

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publications | 01 Apr.2014

Think before you shred - a poster

The ERPC published a poster explaining which documents should be shredded and which not. Based on an original by the American Forest & Paper Association, the poster aims at improving recycling by putting non-sensitive papers straight in the recycling bin.

Shredding shortens paper fibres – recycling whole pieces keeps the fibres long, strong, and ready to be made into new paper.

So think before you shred!

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publications | 04 Feb.2014

Preliminary statistics 2013

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