Confederation of European Paper Industries
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Who is CEPI?

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI)

is a Brussels-based non-profit-making organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing this industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Its collective expertise provides a unique source of information both for and on the industry, coordinating essential exchanges of experience and knowledge among its members while providing technical assistance to legislators. Through its 18 member countries (17 EU members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 515 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 950 paper mills. Together they represent 23% of world production.

Highlights

Who is who at CEPI

Detailed overview of the policy topics CEPI works on and the corresponding Directors/Managers who deal with them.

 

Circular economy video

Watch our new video on why the pulp and paper industry is at the DNA of the circular economy.

 

Adding ambition to the Circular Economy package - an infographic

The paper value chain's three key messages

 

 

Paper recycling in Europe at 71.7% !

A reliable performance secures access to valuable raw material. Read our press release

 

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The circular economy and the pulp and paper industry

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news | 09 Mar.2015

Open letter to Jean-Claude Juncker on the withdrawal and renewed discussion of the circular economy package

CEPI together with other representatives from industry, NGOs, municipalities and public service providers addressed an open letter to Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker. In this letter, they underlined the importance of publishing a new Circular Economy proposal within a short timeframe. According to the co-signatories, this would enable our European economy to rebound through the creation of a circular economy.

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news | 18 Feb.2015

RISI Announces New Event Partnership with CEPI

Cooperation between the groups will mean better programmes for both RISI's 2015 European Conference and CEPI’s European Paper Week.

Boston, 11 February (Press Release) – RISI, the leading information provider for the global forest products industry, today announced a new event partnership with the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI). The agreement will enhance the programme for both RISI’s 2015 European Conference and CEPI’s European Paper Week. It also provides discounts for CEPI members to enable them to attend both events.

"RISI and CEPI share a long history of serving the needs of the European paper industry. This agreement will allow us to combine our resources and provide critical information to those operating in this market. Both events will present critical information to help our clients and constituents navigate these troubling economic times," said Iain Murray, Vice President of Conference Services at RISI.

As part of the new agreement, RISI economists will present at CEPI's European Paper Week and speak on market trends, challenges and opportunities in the European pulp and paper market. In turn, CEPI will provide commission updates and Marco Mensink, Director General of CEPI will present on “A Survival Guide to Europe.” This presentation will discuss the current issues in Europe affecting the European pulp and paper industry.

RISI's European conference will take place from March 9-11 in Amsterdam, Netherlands at the Hilton Amsterdam Hotel. The European Paper Week will take place 17-19 November 2015 in Brussels, Belgium. More details will be available at www.cepi.org/epw at a later stage.
 

About RISI (www.risi.com)
RISI is the leading information provider for the global forest products industry. The company works with clients in the pulp and paper, packaging, wood products, timber, biomass, tissue and nonwovens industries to help them make better decisions.

Headquartered in Boston, MA, RISI operates additional offices throughout North and South America, Europe and Asia.

About CEPI (www.cepi.org)
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 515 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 940 paper mills. Together they represent 23% of world production.

Website: http://www.cepi.org/ mail@cepi.org

 

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Press Release | 20 Mar.2015

Global Forest and Paper Industry Celebrates International Day of Forests (21 March)

WASHINGTON – The theme of the 2015 United Nations International Day of Forests is “Forests and Climate Change.” The International Council of Forest and Paper Associations (ICFPA) is proud to represent the global forest products industry and its commitment to climate change mitigation all along the value chain.

The ICFPA’s Statement on Climate Change is available at: http://www.icfpa.org/uploads/Modules/Publications/icfpa-statement-on-climate-change.pdf

“Trees, especially those in well-managed forests, absorb carbon dioxide,” said ICFPA President Donna Harman. “Carbon dioxide remains stored when trees are used to make forest products, and that storage can be prolonged through recycling.”

In addition, the forest products industry plays an important role in contributing to the production of renewable energy and reducing dependence on fossil fuels by using residuals and byproducts to produce much of the energy required for its operations. These residuals and byproducts, known as biomass, are carbon neutral when combusted for energy, according to the international carbon accounting principle.

Through process and product innovation, the forest products industry is providing a wide range of new sustainable bio-based products that benefit society.
The ICFPA represents more than 30 national and regional forest and paper associations around the world. Together, ICFPA members represent over 90 percent of global paper production and half of global wood production.

For more information about the sustainability of the global forest and paper industry, visit icfpa.org.

 

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Press Release | 25 Feb.2015

CEPI applauds European Commission’s Energy Union Package

Last chance for energy markets - Member states’ support key to its success

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) strongly welcomes the Energy Union Package published today by the European Commission. CEPI especially welcomes the emphasis put on delivering competitive energy prices, investing in the bioeconomy and establishing synergies between the energy efficiency, resource efficiency and circular economy policies.

“This package is the last chance to make energy markets in Europe work”, says Marco Mensink, CEPI Director General. The success of the Energy Union no longer depends on the Commission, but on member states’ willingness to “walk the talk”. CEPI expects national governments to urgently give their support to make the package a reality. A strong EU energy regulator is part of the solution. “In this case, ‘more Europe’ is the answer to the industry and consumers’ need for affordable and competitive energy,” he added.

The package not only recognises that energy costs for industry in Europe are uncompetitive, it also acknowledges that the root of the problem lies in the levies, taxes and additional costs energy consumers are charged for by the member states. If no measures are taken, the need for capacity payments will add yet another layer of costs, affecting all European energy consumers.

CEPI has great expectations for a number of key elements to be later defined in the package proposal. The Commission indicates renewable support schemes would need to be rationalised. The system of subsidies for burning wood for energy can no longer be sustained. Furthermore, establishing an EU biomass supply policy is urgently needed. In addition, energy recovery from waste should be limited to non-recyclable fractions, in line with the waste hierarchy and the requirements for separate collection.

Among the first proposed actions, the Emission Trading System reform offers the possibility to turn the ETS into a tool that rewards investments in low-carbon technologies, while ensuring industrial competitiveness. Engaging industry in this process is crucial. Moreover, the Energy Union should support industrial co-generation, recognising its role in delivering demand side flexibility. This should be part of the combined initiative on the internal energy market, together with the review of the Energy Efficiency Directive and the Guidelines on State Aid for Environmental Protection and Energy.

For more information, please contact Annie Xystouris at a.xystouris@cepi.org, mobile: +32(0)486 243 642.

Note to the author:

European Commission: Energy Union: http://ec.europa.eu/priorities/energy-union/index_en.htm

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Position paper | 19 Mar.2015

Consultation response on the revision of the EU Emission Trading System (EU ETS) Directive

Background: On 24 October 2014, the European Council agreed on the 2030 framework for climate and energy, including a binding domestic target for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of at least 40% in 2030 as compared to 1990. To meet this target, the European Council agreed that the emissions in the EU Emission Trading System should be reduced, compared to 2005, by 43%. A reformed EU ETS remains the main instrument to achieve the emission reduction target. The cap will decline based on an annual linear reduction factor of 2.2% (instead of the current 1.74%) from 2021 onwards, to achieve the necessary emission reductions in the EU ETS. The European Council furthermore gave strategic guidance on several issues regarding the implementation of the emission reduction target, namely free allocation to industry, the establishment of a modernisation and an innovation fund, optional free allocation of allowances to modernise electricity generation in some Member States.

The strategic guidance given by European leaders on these elements will be translated into a legislative proposal to revise the EU ETS for the period post-2020. This constitutes an important part of the work on the achievement of a resilient Energy Union with a forward looking climate change policy, which has been identified as a key policy area in President Juncker's political guidelines for the new Commission.

The purpose of this stakeholder consultation was to gather stakeholders' views on these elements.

CEPI's Key messages :

- The ETS in general, and the benchmarks in particular, should reward installations and sectors reducing GHG emissions, without penalising early movers, new investment made, and low-carbon economic growth. Fiscal and legislative stability and predictability are needed to enable investments in low-carbon technologies.
- The pulp and paper industry cannot pass through carbon costs to its customers: the global market of export goods sets prices, not the production costs of the European industry. This can be easily verified by the lack of correlation between carbon prices and final product prices.
- For “direct carbon costs”, free allocation is a necessary condition but not sufficient to avoid carbon leakage: support mechanisms should be set up to help the EU industry improve its energy efficiency and reduce its GHG emissions.
- Concerning “indirect carbon costs”, it would be better for a mandatory and harmonised EU-wide compensation scheme to address the impact of rising electricity costs due to ETS in all Member States. Financing of compensation schemes should include also, but not be limited to, auctioning revenues from ETS.
- Support for innovation in industry should not come at the expenses of carbon leakage protection: funding for innovation will have to come on top of free allowances for industry. It should be directed to directly finance large-scale demo and pilot projects, as well projects close to commercialisation stage (TRL 6-8). These are high risk, high capital investments where the private sector would not be able to deliver without the backing of public financing.
- The role that European industry plays in the circular economy and in the bioeconomy is of strategic importance for Europe’s access to raw materials and reducing Europe’s carbon footprint. This should be acknowledged when reviewing the EU ETS, by addressing the ETS impact on prices and availability of raw material, such as wood.
 

Read the full reponse.

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Position paper | 28 Nov.2014

CEPI welcomes Commission intentions for meaningful recycling in Europe and identifies enabling measures for meeting ambitious targets

UPDATE: The Commission has recently announced the withdrawal of the waste targets review and will publish a new proposal in the course of 2015.

Comments by CEPI on the European Commission proposal for a DIRECTIVE OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL amending Directives 2008/98/EC on waste, 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste, 1999/31/EC on the landfill of waste, 2000/53/EC on end-of-life vehicles, 2006/66/EC on batteries and accumulators and waste batteries and accumulators, and 2012/19/EU on waste electrical and electronic equipment /* COM/2014/0397 final - 2014/0201 (COD)

Summary

• Recycling Targets must be ambitious but realistic to increase collection in an environment where some Member States have already reached high recycling rates. Member States should set their target for paper packaging recycling at a minimum of 80% by 2020.
• Packaging Recycling targets in Europe should not discriminate between the different consumer packaging materials
• The proposed methodology to calculate recycling rates can favour high quality recycling but it should refer to material specific standards or similar quality assurances. For paper, the input method should continue to apply under strict input quality criteria, including for exports
• Incineration restrictions and separate paper collection obligations are needed as complementary measures to ensure recyclable paper diverted from landfills gets actually recycled.
• Final recycling must be clearly defined to ensure targets are meaningful and can be compared between Member States.

Recycling Targets: Minimum targets for Paper Packaging Recycling Rates should be set at 80% by 2020 in all Member States


European Paper Industry is a world champion in recycling, but reaching new targets will be increasingly challenging as several Member States have already reached recycling rates close to the theoretical potential of paper recycling. The average European Paper Recycling rate was 71,7% in 2013 and the sector has set a target of 70% recycling rate by 2015. The recycling rate has increased significantly from levels around 40% in 1990 and 62% in 2005, but has started levelling up since the last five years. As we reach the absolute potentials of paper recycling in some Member States, setting ambitious targets in all Member States is crucial to further stipulate recycling in less than average performing countries. Too ambitious average targets alone will however not be sufficient to reach the objectives set out in the circular economy communication. Further improvement of the paper and board packaging recycling rate will largely depend on progress in less than average performing countries. CEPI therefore proposes that all Member States set their target for paper packaging recycling at a minimum of 80% by 2020. Concrete targets for 2025 and 2030 should be set once the performance based on the proposed methodology and progress towards 2020 targets is assessed, e.g. through the newly proposed early warning system.
Recycling targets in Europe should not discriminate between consumer packaging materials and one material should not compensate for others in a Member State’s calculation of all packaging waste prepared for re-use and recycled. Recyclability and the recycling performance have increasingly become key aspects in the competition between consumer packaging materials.


Calculation Methodology : for paper, the input method should continue to apply under strict input quality criteria
CEPI welcomes the Commission’s intention to set the focus on high quality recycling. The recycling process can only deliver efficiently produced high quality recycled products if the input to this final recycling process fulfills strict quality requirements, too. The Commission proposal rightly distinguishes between final recycling processes with « clean » input material, for which the input method would continue to be applied, and final recycling processes with lesser quality material, for which the output method would have to be applied. CEPI understands the proposed discarded materials as non-target material that is not part of the original product and can be separated in dry sorting.
In the production of recycled paper, the input material for the recycling process is covered by a European Standard (EN 643). This standard sets limits on the share of non-paper components generally not exceeding 1,5%. CEPI is therefore of the opinion that for paper, the input method should continue to apply. However, the Commission proposal leaves too much room for interpretation and should refer to European Standards or similar quality assurances.
Paper for Recycling exported outside the European Union should count towards the recycling rate provided it meets the EN 643 standard and is effectively recycled outside Europe at broadly equivalent environmental conditions as in the EU. This should be demonstrated by a certification scheme as it is being considered by the European Commission and which would include in its scope the reprocessing site in the destination country and ensure traceability through adequate documentation.
Furthermore, it is of great importance that the denominator for the calculation of the recycling rates is identical in all Member States to allow for comparison.

Complementary measures to reach recycling targets
To reach high recycling targets based on the proposed new methodology, complementary measures next to the introduction of a landfill ban are however essential:


Incineration restrictions
CEPI welcomes the introduction of a landfill ban for recyclable waste. However, CEPI thinks that formulating a landfill ban for recyclable material and high recycling targets is not sufficient to reach the objectives. CEPI therefore thinks it is needed to formulate incineration restrictions for recyclable material from the municipal waste stream. This is to avoid waste is only shifted one step up in the waste hierarchy. In the past, several Member States have set the focus on diversion from landfill. This has partly led to low quality collection systems, which would not be able to deliver the input quality to recycling processes according to the new methodology as suggested bythe Commission proposal.

Obligation to collect paper separately from other recyclables and residual waste
To ensure reaching the required quality input for paper recycling processes, paper should be collected separately from other recyclables such as plastics, metal and glass, and from residual waste. The Waste Directive of 2008 has formulated a separate collection target in 2008, however Member States have interpreted this requirement in different ways. CEPI therefore urges the Commission to reinforce the requirement on separate collection for paper. Separate collection is crucial to achieve the landfill restrictions proposed by the commission.


Current recycling definition is too vague
The current definition of recycling is too vague, as it includes next to “reprocessing” also “any other recovery operations”. This leads to a wide range of interpretations, including on the recycling rate, between countries and materials. The only way to ensure material that has been discarded is effectively back in the circular economy is to make sure it is not recognized recycled unless it is reprocessed in a production process into new products, materials or substances that have comparable properties to the corresponding virgin raw materials. The proposed methodology for high quality recycling cannot be reached without a precise recycling definition. Article 3 (17) of directive 2008/98/EC should be amended as follows :


• ‘recycling’ means any recovery operation by which waste materials are reprocessed into products, materials or substances whether for the original or other purposes. It includes the reprocessing of organic material but does not include energy recovery and the reprocessing into materials that are to be used as fuels or for backfilling operations; ‘final recycling’ means reprocessing in a production process of waste or materials reclaimed from waste into products, materials or substances with similar properties as the equivalent virgin raw material based product, material or substance. It excludes pre-processing.


Next to these measures, CEPI has the following comments on the Commission proposal:
Extended Producer Responsibility : CEPI believes that the proposed provisions of Annex VII paragraph 6.1 and 6.4 place disproportionate financial burden on producers and cover aspects beyond the producers’ control. Putting the burden of « financial contributions to cover the entire cost of waste management… » would act as a disincentive for other actors with roles and responsibilities in the waste collection and sorting chain to focus on cost efficiency. Consequently the competitiveness of European economy would be harmed. CEPI believes that extended producer responsibility should not allow overlapping and duplicating payments: fees should only apply in absence of action when responsibility is delegated to compliance schemes, and fees should be charged on the basis of true cost after the deduction of all fees and revenues related to the waste generated. CEPI also believes Annex VII concerning minimum requirements for EPR should not be amended through the adoption of delegated acts since they are an essential part of the legislation.
Renewability : CEPI is concerned that the Commission published a proposal on the circular economy without mentioning renewability. CEPI believes that the contribution of renewable materials and products to the circular economy should be acknowledged, e.g. by adding renewability to the packaging eco-design options for Member States consideration. CEPI believes that such a non-binding list of ecodesign options is preferred over national packaging design requirements as proposed by the Commission as the latter would undermine the single market by producing barriers to trade.
Definition of Municipal Waste : The definition of municipal waste should not include material from the retail sector. The collection of waste from the retail sector is already well organised. Including the retail sector would divert the focus from the challenge of improving the waste collection from households and small shops.


For more information, please contact Mr. Ulrich Leberle at (u.leberle@cepi.org), mobile n°: +32 479 905 921

 

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publications | 04 Mar.2015

Adding ambition to the Circular Economy package - an infographic

The European Commission has formally announced that the circular economy package, as presented in July 2014, is withdrawn from the Commission work programme. The Commission is committed to replacing the package with a “new and more ambitious” proposal. Under the lead of the General Secretariat it has formed a working group involving the different Commission departments (Directorate Generals) to work on this new proposal in the first half of the year.

For that purpose, CEPI has worked with the colleagues from the paper packaging organisations on an infographic illustrating our vision on the circular economy package, expanding from the waste management aspects to renewability and bioeconomy.

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publications | 04 Feb.2015

Preliminary Statistics 2014

Paper and board production by CEPI member countries fell slightly, by around 0.2% in 2014 according to preliminary figures. The total production in 2014 was around 91 million tonnes, 10% below the pre-financial crisis level.
Mill and machine closures in the EU-28 in 2014 amounted to 0.9 million tonnes whilst new capacities or upgrading of existing ones reached 0.5 million tonnes.

It is estimated that the production of pulp (integrated + market) has decreased by around 4.3% when compared to the previous year, with total output of approximately 36 million tonnes. Output of market pulp decreased by around 3.7%.

It is estimated that the utilisation of paper for recycling by CEPI members was unchanged when compared to 2013 at 47.5 million tonnes.
As in recent years, the fall of the graphic paper sector demand was offset by the more positive development in the packaging paper and board sector.

Based on the cumulative data up to the end of the third quarter of 2014 it is expected that total paper and board deliveries for the year will have fallen by between 0.5% and 1.0% when compared to 2013.

It appears that the overall consumption of paper and board in CEPI countries in 2014 increased by between 0.5% and 1.0% when compared to 2013, based on the latest data available.


 

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