Recycling

Recycling
Publication | 01 Apr.2014

Think before you shred - a poster

We’ve all shredded pieces of paper before throwing them in the recycling bin, sometimes simply as a habit. What a lot of us do not know is that shredding shortens paper fibres. Why is that bad?, you might ask. The answer is simple. The longer the fibre, the more valuable the paper is for the recycling process.

 

When it comes to what should and shouldn’t be shredded, keep this in mind: if the paper has sensitive information on it, shred it; if not, don’t. The European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) has recently published a new poster illustrating this principle.

The poster shows two different groups of documents falling into a recycling bin or a shredder. In the ‘recycling group’ you can find books, magazines, office paper and cards, while the ‘shredder group’ includes examples such as investment transactions, accountancy and medical records, tax forms, credit card statements and pay slips.

Since 2000, the European paper value chain has joined efforts to improve recycling in Europe via the ERPC. You can help them achieve their goal. Before shredding your paper, think about whether you need to shred it. You will be serving the environment and contributing to reducing waste, pollution and climate change, while saving office costs.

“Think before you shred”’ follows last year’s very successful “Paper Recycling in the Office” guidance and is based on an example by the American Forest & Paper Association. The ERPC plans to distribute the poster also to European Commission employees as well as to the newly elected European Parliament members in September.

 

 

 

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Position paper | 14 Feb.2014

Landfill and incineration restriction for recyclable paper

Increase the availability of paper for recycling in the EU

Summary
• As part of the Waste Target review, the paper industry proposes an EU-wide ban on landfilling/incineration of recyclable paper by 2020.
• Current EU paper recycling performance could increase by 10 million tonnes of paper and board if diverted from landfilling and incineration. Theoretically this incremental volume could result in a paper recycling rate of about 80% (71.7% was achieved in 2012).
• The policy context in the EU supports the notion of diverting recyclable materials from landfilling and incineration to recycling. However, without a legal requirement,local authorities do not always make recycling a priority for these streams. The paper industry is committed to supporting them in doing so.

 

Issue
In 2012, about 78.5 million tonnes of paper were consumed in Europe (EU-27). Of this volume, 56 million tonnes were recycled. An estimated volume of 10 million tonnes of paper and board, potentially useful for recycling, is currently going into incineration or landfill. The industry sees this as a valuable source of material that could be put back into the production cycle – increasing the current EU recycling rate significantly – but needs legal support to enable this because waste management decisions are mostly made by local authorities. The paper industry is committed to supporting local authorities in improving the collection of paper for recycling.


Increasing the availability of paper for recycling will have a positive effect on job and value creation in the EU, both in the waste management sector as well as in the processing industries. An extra 10 million tonnes would result in a paper recycling rate of about 80% (71.7% in 2012).


A ban in landfill will bring about a coherent implementation of EU policy
European Commission communications emphasise that a resource-efficient Europe needs to turn its own waste into a resource so as to decrease its dependence on imports of raw materials, reduce the impacts on the environment and generate economic opportunities.


The Waste Framework Directive includes a waste hierarchy which clearly prioritises recycling over energy recovery and disposal. One of the key conclusions of the European Commission’s report on the Thematic Strategy on the Prevention and Recycling of Waste1 is that ‘’Significant margin for progress still exists beyond the current EU minimum collection and recycling targets’’. ‘’[An] optimal combination of economic and legal instruments should be promoted notably through landfill bans and by applying the producer responsibility concept to additional waste streams on the basis of a common European approach’’.

The Road Map for a Resource Efficient Europe foresees: ‘’By 2020, waste [will be] managed as a resource’’. ‘’Energy recovery is limited to non-recyclable materials, landfilling is virtually eliminated and high quality recycling is ensured’’. Europe needs to step up its efforts so as to achieve this milestone for all recyclable materials by 2020.


CEPI believes that recyclable paper presents a material source for which the above milestone can be realistically met by 2020 at the latest. A specific ban on landfilling/incineration of recyclable paper could mark the first concrete step towards the elimination of incineration/landfilling of all recyclable materials by 2020 or at a later date where appropriate.


For more information, please contact Mr. Jori Ringman-Beck at (j.ringman-beck@cepi.org), mobile n°: +32 478 255 070.

1 European Commission, 2011. Report from the Commission on the Thematic Strategy on the Prevention and Recycling of Waste. COM(2011) 13 final, p 9

 

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Press Release | 12 Dec.2013

CEPI Guidance for revised EN643 published

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) launched a pocket-size guidance document that details the changes in the revised EN643 European List of Standard Grades of Paper and Board for Recycling. The association also announced that they will organise a webinar on the EN643 revision on 19 December 2013.

CEPI advises all organisations and individuals involved in trade with paper and board for recycling, to prepare for the introduction of the updated standard. Many multinational companies are already implementing the new EN643 standard into their IT-systems, such as SAP. The new text includes several major improvements, including a grade-specific tolerance level for non-paper component and more detailed descriptions per grade.

CEPI issued a guidance describing the changes in the updated EN643, whilst national standardisation bodies in Europe are preparing for the official launch early 2014. The guidance was first presented at European Paper Week in English, but will soon be available in German, French, Spanish and Polish. Other languages may follow at a later stage.
Paper industry experts will be available for question and answers at a webinar organised by CEPI on 19 December 2013 at 10 am. During the webinar CEPI staff will describe the changes in the EN643 standard in detail and will allow for enough time to answer all queries.
 

#END#


For more information, please contact Daniela Haiduc at d.haiduc@cepi.org, mobile: +32(0)473 562 936


Note to the Editor
Download EN643 guidance at www.cepi.org/en643

 

 

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Press Release | 10 Dec.2013

Paper Industry Applauds European Parliament Decision to Defend Recycling Jobs in Europe

European Commission asked to go back to the drawing board

The European paper industry warmly welcomes today's decision by the European Parliament to block proposed legislation which would have had the effect of classifying waste paper as "recycled" paper before it has been recycled1. This vote in Strasbourg will save more than 20,000 direct green jobs in the paper industry and an estimated additional 140,000 indirect jobs in Europe.

"We are glad to see the European Parliament remembered that the original purpose of defining when something is no longer to be considered a waste was to facilitate recycling not to obstruct it," comments Teresa Presas, Director General of the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI), on the outcome in Strasbourg. "If this proposal had become law it would also have burdened the global environment with needless additional energy use and emissions. It's a good decision.”

If this legislation had passed, it would have relaxed the EU's waste management rules and triggered a flight of waste paper out of the EU to Asia, pushing up prices in Europe and undermining the quality of waste paper available for the European recycling sector. This in turn would have crippled the world class paper recycling in the EU, the result of years of investment by the paper recycling industry here. Paper recycling in Europe would likely have dropped from about 47 million tonnes per year to 37 million tonnes, leading to closures of mills, including many small and medium-sized operators.

Today, the European Parliament plenary backed the earlier decision of its specialist environment committee to reject the Commission initiative, voting in favour by 606 votes to 77. MEPs insisted that the Commission had not properly assessed the impacts of its draft regulation on paper recycling and in shipments of waste paper to third countries. The Parliament also argued that the proposal was not compatible with the aim and content of the EU's basic framework directive on waste and exceeded the implementing powers conferred on the Commission by that directive - a comprehensive rejection.

In September this year, CEPI temporarily dumped bales of waste paper in front of the Commission's headquarters building in Brussels to draw attention to the problem. Shortly after, the EU member states voting on the issue failed to reach a majority on what to do, leaving it up to MEPs to decide whether or not to send the Commission back to the drawing board.

“We are delighted that the voice of reason has finally emerged," explains Jori Ringman-Beck, CEPI Recycling and Product Director. "We now hope that the Commission's environmental protection department will reflect on the content of this resolution and revise the criteria for determining when used paper is waste and when it's not.”

CEPI is not against defining criteria to determine when used paper ceases to be classified as waste, but maintains that the approach now needs to be fundamentally revisited and aligned with the newer more progressive criteria that the Commission has developed lately for other material streams. In general, the old approach, which was carried over by the Commission into the paper proposal just rejected in Strasbourg, has hardly been implemented in practice - indicating that these measures have not been able to capture what is needed by the market in reality.

#END#


For more information, please contact Daniela Haiduc at d.haiduc@cepi.org, mobile: +32(0)473562936

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1 Motion for a Resolution on the draft Commission regulation on defining criteria determining when recovered paper ceases to be waste


Note to the Editor

Resolution from the European Parliament:
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/meetdocs/2009_2014/documents/envi/re/1005/1005273/1005273en.pdf

Official European Parliament reaction: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/news-room/content/20131210IPR30409/html/MEPs-veto-paper-waste-proposal-amid-environmental-concerns

More photos: CEPI End-of-waste for paper protest: http://www.cepi.org/photogallery/endofwasteprotest

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News | 29 Nov.2013

The new EN643

EN 643 is the European List of Standard Grdes of Paper and Board for Recycling. Revised in 2013, the new text includes several major improvements, including a grade-specific tolerance level for non-paper component and more detailed descriptions per grade. CEPI advises all organisations and individuals involved in trade with paper and board for recycling to implement and use the updated standard.

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The CEPI guidance document

We launched a guidance document that details the changes in the revised EN643, to give advice to sellers and buyers of paper for recycling. The guidance was first launched at European Paper Week in English, but is already available in French and Portuguese. Other languages may follow.

English version

Portuguese version

 French version

We have also prepared a summary one-pager and a power point presentation(in English).

A webinar detaling the changes in the revised standard was organised in December 2013: The video recording is available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tISOY39D3k (length=1hour)

We also prepared the following video giving the most important reasons for using the guidance:

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The updated EN643 standard

The updated EN643 standard is now available on the national standardisation websites below:

   
Link Link Link  Link Link Link Link Link Link Link
 (EN)  (EN)  (DE, EN)  (DE, EN) (EN, FR, NL) (FR) (EN) (EN) (EN) (EN)

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Responsible Management of Recovered Paper: Guidelines on reponsible sourcing and quality control

Publication | 27 Nov.2013

The new EN643 guidance

CEPI launched a pocket-size guidance document that details the changes in the revised EN643 European List of Standard Grades of Paper and Board for Recycling.

We also organised a webinar on the EN643 revision on 19 December 2013. We advise all organisations and individuals involved in trade with paper and board for recycling, to prepare for the introduction of the updated standard. Many multinational companies are already implementing the new EN643 standard into their IT-systems, such as SAP. The new text includes several major improvements, including a grade-specific tolerance level for non-paper component and more detailed descriptions per grade.

This guidance was first launched at European Paper Week in English, but will soon be available in German, French, Spanish and Polish. Other languages may follow. In a webinar organised on 19 December 2013 at 10 am, paper industry experts described the changes in the EN643 standard in detail and allowed for enough time to answer all queries.

A webinar detailing all the changes in the revised standard can be viewed here(length=1 hour)

View our video with the most important reasons why we should use the guidance here.

The document is also available in Portuguese and French.

Portuguese version

 French version

The updated EN643 standard is now available in English for purchase on the British, German and Dutch standardisation websites:

             
Link Link Link              
                   

 

 

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Press Release | 08 Nov.2013

Standardisation bodies vote to improve quality of paper recycling

CEPI advises industry to prepare for the updated EN643 standard


Paper and board for recycling is a very important secondary raw material for the European paper industry. To improve quality and the definition of grades for this raw material, the European List of Standard Grades of Paper and Board for Recycling is being revised by CEN - the European Committee for Standardisation. National standardisation bodies that are members of CEN, voted unanimously in favour of the update to the EN643 standard this week. This vote was the culmination of many years of work by the involved parties.


As a next step, the final text for the revised EN643 will be translated and published by CEN and its national standardisation bodies latest in February 2014. The CEN working group was able to agree on several improvements to the EN643, including a grade-specific tolerance level for non-paper components and more detailed descriptions per grade.

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) advises all organisations and individuals involved in trade with paper and board for recycling, to prepare for the introduction of the updated standard. Jori Ringman-Beck, CEPI Recycling and Environment Director, stressed: “Although this material has a waste status legally, it is important to push quality management through the whole supply chain.”

CEPI has been advocating responsible sourcing and quality management of paper for recycling over 10 years and is now organising an information session on the EN643 during the European Paper Week on 27 November in Brussels. Throughout the meeting CEPI experts will describe the detailed changes to the standard. In addition, CEPI is preparing a guidance document that explains the differences to the old EN 643 in a printed pocket-size format. It will first be available to participants at the European Paper Week.


CEPI and the European Federation representing the European waste management industry (FEAD), as well as the European Recovered Paper Association (ERPA) initiated the update of the standard by submitting a joint revision proposal back in May 2011. In April 2013 the CEN/TC172 Working Group 2 sent their recommendations for the EN643 revision to CEN for final approval and vote by their members.


Commenting on the vote, Mr Ringman-Beck said: “We are happy that the standardisation authorities agreed with the revisions further improving the EN643 standard. I believe the new EN643 will surely advance the quality of paper for recycling and improve paper recycling by eliminating unwanted materials early on in the paper recovery process. This is another contribution by CEPI, ERPA and FEAD to a resource efficient EU.“


For more information, please contact Daniela Haiduc at d.haiduc@cepi.org, mobile: +32(0)473562936


Note to the Editor

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 520 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 950 paper mills. Together they represent 24% of world production.

European Paper Week: http://www.cepi.org/EPW

CEN standardisation bodies: http://www.cen.eu/cen/Members/Pages/default.aspx
 

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Press Release | 04 Nov.2013

Commission proposal will benefit Asian industry

The European paper industry closes the loop in paper recycling in Europe with a world record recycling rate of 72 %. The European Commission’s DG Environment is now disrupting the best practices that supported this, by an ill-advised proposal for end-of-waste for paper.


The European Commission proposal on end-of-waste criteria for paper jeopardises jobs and paper recycling in Europe. European paper industries’ competitors in Asia will benefit from the current proposal, as it facilitates exports of recovered paper, of which the collection is largely paid by European tax payers. The end-of-waste criteria - as they are currently set – would make shipments of this precious raw material to Asia simpler and increase pollution through transport and recycling in facilities with weaker environmental policies.


The European paper industry could be self-sufficient in using recovered paper from Europe. Instead, the Commission endangers its best practice example in resource efficiency: paper recycling. The European Parliament will vote on an objection to the end-of-waste criteria for paper in the Environment Committee on 5 November. In the resolution objecting the proposal cross-party MEPs declare that the European Commission has stepped outside its legal mandate.

Commenting on the resolution from the European Parliament Teresa Presas, CEPI Director General, said: “It is obvious from past behaviour and from current communications by the Dutch traders and speculators of waste that their interests are contrasting the European paper industries’ interests. We are the buyers of recovered paper on the market, they want to sell.”

“As users of recovered paper we want to be able to set the quality specifications for our raw material. We hope the European Parliament and the European Commission will keep in mind that the original purpose of end-of-waste criteria is to facilitate recycling, not to obstruct it nor to burden the global environment!”, she stressed.

The jobs created by waste management companies are the same, whether the material they collect will be recycled in Europe or in Asia. But jobs and extra value in the re-processing and manufacturing industry are only kept in Europe, when the material is available in Europe. The end-of-waste criteria will cause a drop from 47 million tonnes to 37 million tonnes in paper recycling in Europe leading to closures of mills, including SMEs, and losses of 20,500 direct green jobs in the paper industry and additionally 140,000 indirect jobs in Europe.

The majority of EU member states at the Council and the whole European paper industry are opposed to the current end-of-waste criteria – not the end-of-waste principle as such. The European Commission failed to submit a justification for moving the point of end-of-waste from the current point after reprocessing in paper mills to before reprocessing. Furthermore, defining end-of-waste before recycling has actually taken place would cause problems in relation to a vast body of existing Community legislation such as eco-labels, public procurement, eco-design and REACH where ‘recycling’ is referred to.

Jori Ringman-Beck, CEPI Recycling and Product Director explained: The European Commission has changed the way it deals with End-of-Waste and the current proposal for paper is still reflecting the early thinking of DG Environment in this area. The bureaucratic inertia of DG Environment now means they are pushing for adoption of a proposal that was drafted years ago and does not fulfil its original purpose: to facilitate resource efficient paper recycling made in Europe. We have been asking for quite some time and will continue to ask DG Environment to reflect on the on-going discussions and to revise the criteria for end-of-waste for paper.”

According to the Commission proposal, this paper in its actual form is ready to use ‘recycled paper’ – i.e. to be put into a printer, drafting a document on or be awarded an EU Ecolabel.


For more information, please contact Daniela Haiduc at d.haiduc@cepi.org, mobile: +32(0)473562936


Note to the Editor

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 520 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 950 paper mills. Together they represent 24% of world production.

Commission proposal for end-of-waste
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2013:0502:FIN:EN:PDF

Euractiv article Circular economy calls on the EU to think globally, act locally: http://www.euractiv.com/sustainability/circular-economy-calls-eu-think-analysis-531915

CEPI impact assessment of End-of-waste


 

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News | 04 Oct.2013

ERPC declares 2013 paper recycling awards winners

Yesterday, the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) announced the winners of the fourth European Paper Recycling awards. The well-attended ceremony took place at the European Parliament and was hosted by ALDE MEP Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy, who opened the event. "With the increasing world population resource efficiency is no luxury. It's a necessity to stay competitive. For now the EU is still the world leader concerning paper recycling. But if we want to stay in that position we need to set paper collection targets when the EU waste legislation is being reviewed next year", he stated.


First winner in the category Technology Improvement and R&D was Voith Paper GmbH & Co. KG with a new technology called LowEnergyFlotation (LEF). “This is an innovative technique that significantly reduces the energy requirements needed to remove printing ink from paper fibres”, explained product manager Reinhard Bluhm.


The newly developed injectors are at the heart of the LEF. Together with the modified pumps, they enable energy consumption to be reduced by up to 50% in the flotation. Subsequently, paper mills not only save energy but also achieve significant financial savings. The LEF technology has already been applied to more than 10 systems worldwide.


The winner of the category Information and Education was the Alcorcón municipality in Spain. Their project improves paper and board collection by distributing paper bins in all schools in the district. The project aims to increase both the amount of paper collected as well as environmental awareness among children. “In the end, more than 15,000 children will know how to recycle paper and will have learned the importance of recycling”, said Alcorcon’s waste collection officer Susana Mozo, speaking at the ceremony.


In her speech ERPC Chairperson Beatrice Klose stressed the role of the recycling awards. “The European paper recycling awards recognise innovative approaches to paper recycling, which is a daily act, familiar to all. It is our pleasure to highlight a few of those that merit wider recognition and
visibility”, she added.


Three more entries were commended by the jury: International Paper Kwidzyn for its entry ‘Seventh Heaven for Newspapers’ (Information and Education category), Lucart Group for “Natural Project: Tissue paper from beverage cartons” and Reculiner bvba for their work on “Sustainable paper release liner recycling” (Technology Improvement and R&D category).

For more information, please contact the ERPC Secretariat, Jori Ringman, at +32 2 627 49 19, +32 478 255070 (gsm), erpc@cepi.org.

For the press release please go to the ERPC website.

For more information on the winners and commended entries, go to http://www.paperforrecycling.eu/recycling-awards

Here are some photos from the event:  

News | 11 Sep.2013

End-of-Waste = end of recycling?

Commission proposes end of recycling


The European paper industry represented by CEPI (Confederation of European Paper Industries) organised a press action on 11 September 2013 in front of the Berlaymont with the title: End-of-Waste = end of recycling?

The European paper industry is on the ‘barricade’ and displayed seven bales of paper for recycling worth 2000 euros in front of the main European Commission building – the Berlaymont in Brussels from 7 am to 7 pm.

The European Commission proposal on End-of-Waste (EoW) criteria for paper fails to address the objectives of increasing the quality and availability of paper for recycling and will have an adverse impact on making Europe a resource efficient recycling society.

Europeans are champions in paper recycling - but for how long? In 2012, 71.7% of paper consumed in Europe was recycled. Used paper has become the single most important raw material for the European paper industry with some mills being completely reliant on it for their feedstock. The Commission proposal threatens Europe’s ability to maintain its recycling rates for paper, let alone improve them.

The European Commission’s End-of-Waste criteria for paper move the recycling and EoW point from its current location at the paper mill to an earlier stage in the collection. As a result of this move ‘recycled paper’ will be unusable without further reprocessing.

The detailed reasons for this action are explained in the CEPI press release: http://www.cepi.org/topic/recycling/pressrelease/endofwaste

The Council could not reach an opinion on the End-of-Waste criteria for paper, which leaves the European Parliament to give their opinion and finally the European Commission to decide whether to publish these criteria as they are or to re-work them.

Here pictures of the press conference and the press action in front of the Berlaymont: http://www.cepi.org/photogallery/endofwasteprotesthttp://www.cepi.org/photogallery/endofwastepressconference

Video footage: http://youtu.be/guXtZf7XKSk

Commission proposal for end-of-waste
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2013:0502:FIN:EN:PDF

European Paper Recycling: monitoring report
http://www.paperforrecycling.eu/uploads/Modules/Publications/WEB_lowres_Monitoring%20report%202012.pdf

For more information, contact Daniela Haiduc d.haiduc@cepi.org or at +32 473 562 936
 

 

Press Release | 10 Sep.2013

End-of-Waste = End of recycling?

European Commission proposes end of recycling

The European Commission proposal on End-of-Waste (EoW) criteria for paper fails to address the objectives of increasing the quality and availability of paper for recycling and will have an adverse impact on making Europe a resource efficient recycling society.

Europeans are champions in paper recycling - but for how long? In 2012, 71.7% of paper consumed in Europe was recycled. Used paper has become the single most important raw material for the European paper industry with some mills being completely reliant on it for their feedstock. The Commission proposal threatens Europe’s ability to maintain its recycling rates for paper, let alone improve them.

The European Commission’s End-of-Waste criteria for paper move the recycling and EoW point from its current location at the paper mill to an earlier stage in the collection. As a result of this move ‘recycled paper’ will be unusable without further reprocessing.

The Commission cannot demonstrate any environmental benefit for doing this. As a result the European paper industry fears the new legislation risks a lower quality of paper for recycling and poses a threat to current high levels of paper recycling. In fact, as the Waste Shipment Regulation would no longer apply, environmental impact will be negative.

View pictures here: http://www.cepi.org/photogallery/endofwasteprotest

CEPI is displaying seven bales of paper for recycling in front of the European Commission’s Berlaymont building in Brussels.

“This is ‘recycled paper’, according to the Commission. CEPI challenges anyone to use it in their printer or to draft a legislative proposal on it”, remarked Jori Ringman, CEPI Recycling and Environment Director.

The amount of impurities in the output of end-of-waste would be 15,000 times higher than they are at this moment. Annually this will mean 1 million tonnes of impurities such as plastic bags allowed by the Commission in Europe. In addition, used paper that is no longer waste, shipped to countries outside of Europe would no longer be subject to equivalent environmental standards in the manufacture of paper products.

“With this proposal, the European Commission will be exporting pollution to the poor and importing unemployment to Europe”, said Jori Ringman, CEPI Recycling and Environment Director. “It all works against the idea of the EU becoming a resource efficient recycling society as well as against the re-industrialisation of Europe.”


For more information, pictures, video footage and interview requests, please contact Daniela Haiduc at d.haiduc@cepi.org, mobile: +32 473 562 936

Note to the Editor

Commission proposal for end-of-waste
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2013:0502:FIN:EN:PDF

European Paper Recycling: monitoring report
http://www.paperforrecycling.eu/uploads/Modules/Publications/WEB_lowres_Monitoring%20report%202012.pdf

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 520 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 950 paper mills. Together they represent 24% of world production.

 

Press briefing on 10 September, Brussels

 

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Publication | 30 Aug.2013

ERPC Monitoring report 2012

The European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) announced an impressive 71.7% paper recycling rate for Europe. In their annual monitoring report the ERPC revealed that current paper consumption in Europe has dropped by 13% to the level of 1998, but the recycled amount of paper is 1.5 times higher than in 1998 - a remarkable achievement.

Since 2000 the ERPC has worked consistently on improving the quantity and quality of paper available for recycling. The ERPC monitoring report releases extra insights into the wider context of paper recycling revealing that Europe is the global champion in this field. Furthermore, the ERPC reports that in Europe paper fibre is recycled an astounding 3.5 times a year; world-wide the average is 2.4 times. 

The report illustrates additional good news. The number of European countries with a recycling rate below 60% has decreased, whereas there are an established 13 countries where paper recycling rates exceed 70%. To increase paper recycling especially in Central Europe, several ERPC members are partners in EU funded projects working to improve collection systems in that region.

Commenting on the results of the report, ERPC Secretary Jori Ringman-Beck, said “The European paper value chain devotes huge efforts year after year to simplify paper recycling for citizens and consumers in offices and at home. The figures in the report prove that paper recycling is truly an industry “made in Europe”. And in line with EU policies it needs to be safeguarded to remain so.”

In addition, the ERPC will award innovative technology developments and information campaigns in paper recycling at the European Paper Recycling Awards. The event takes place on 2 October in the European Parliament. For more information please go to www.paperforrecycling.eu

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News | 30 Aug.2013

Europe recycles 71.7% of paper and board used in 2012

The European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) announced an impressive 71.7% paper recycling rate for Europe. In their annual monitoring report the ERPC revealed that current paper consumption in Europe has dropped by 13% to the level of 1998, but the recycled amount of paper is 1.5 times higher than in 1998 - a remarkable achievement. Since 2000 the ERPC has worked consistently on improving the quantity and quality of paper available for recycling. The ERPC monitoring report releases extra insights into the wider context of paper recycling revealing that Europe is the global champion in this field. Furthermore, the ERPC reports that in Europe paper fibre is recycled an astounding 3.5 times a year; world-wide the average is 2.4 times.

The report illustrates additional good news. The number of European countries with a recycling rate below 60% has decreased, whereas there are an established 13 countries where paper recycling rates exceed 70%. To increase paper recycling especially in Central Europe, several ERPC members are partners in EU funded projects working to improve collection systems in that region.

Commenting on the results of the report, ERPC Secretary Jori Ringman-Beck, said “The European paper value chain devotes huge efforts year after year to simplify paper recycling for citizens and consumers in offices and at home. The figures in the report prove that paper recycling is truly an industry “made in Europe”. And in line with EU policies it needs to be safeguarded to remain so.”

In addition, the ERPC will award innovative technology developments and information campaigns in paper recycling at the European Paper Recycling Awards. The event takes place on 2 October in the European Parliament. For more information please go to www.paperforrecycling.eu

View the monitoring report here.

 

News | 08 Jul.2013

When being stingy became a competitive advantage

​Republished blog originally by Päivi Salpakivi-Salomaa from UPM:

Natural resources are drying up all around the world as the population grows and standards of living improve. By 2030, there will be an additional three billion more consumers with a solid financial standing in the world.

The increased level of consumption gives rise to global concerns: climate change, decreased biodiversity, lack of clean water and rising prices of raw materials. The pressure to protect both renewable and fossil natural resources is increasing.
We all face these challenges together: individuals, companies, authorities and non-governmental organisations.

We should use natural resources sparingly to ensure that future generations will be able to live in a more sustainable world.
Using raw materials sparingly, or resource efficiency, has been discussed by leading enterprises of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), and it is one of the flagship projects of EU's Europe 2020 strategy. The EU requires that its member states recycle, implement a vision to stop waste and introduce smart technologies.

The industrial policy of the future has reached a crossroads: will we achieve the resource efficiency and technological innovations by adopting stricter regulations, or should we promote them by introducing incentives? A workgroup that has drafted the Finnish vision for 2030 focusing on the sparing use of resources believes that regulation is the key. At the same time there is strong evidence from other parts of the world that taking the completely opposite approach works just as well: South Korea supports the development of green technology by means of major national investments.

Being stingy is not just about living sparingly: in the corporate world, it is also a competitive advantage. Large integrated industrial facilities improve their use of energy and raw materials by combining the know-how of various top experts – which is an important competitive advantage. Materials are the main cost item for industrial companies, which means that they tend to pay attention to how they use their raw materials.

By-products of lable is the raw material for ProFi deck.

For example, the forestry industry sees today's by-products and waste as tomorrow's raw materials. Materials that end their life in landfill usually amount to less than one percent of all the raw materials originally arriving at a mill. This approach has also led to innovations involving the replacement of non-renewable materials with renewable ones. Resource-efficient innovations have also been developed in the fields of logistics, technology and production.

 

UPM ProFi deck's wood-plastic composites are based on recycled material.

In the future, you will be able to choose which you want to use: products manufactured from fossil, renewable or recycled materials. Recycled materials are preferred by many, but products cannot be created based on recycling alone. For example, you can only recycle a newspaper seven times before you will need to use new fibres.
So how can Finland support the progressive industrial policy? The best approach from an industrial viewpoint is to encourage people to use both renewable and recyclable materials. We can create incentives for small companies, reduce the level of bureaucracy, reward businesses for green, responsible and transparent operations and allow them to engage in business more sensibly. Pioneers understand how important resource efficiency is, because common sense dictates that using resources based on the company's own means is the best way to cut costs.

Päivi Salpakivi-Salomaa, VP, Environmental Affairs, UPM
Chairperson of the European Resource Efficiency Platform
World Business Council for Sustainable Development, Liaison Delegate

The article has been published in the Finnish magazine Suomen Kuvalehti on 20 June 2013.

Originally published by UPM on UPM blog: http://www.upm.com/EN/MEDIA/upm-blog/Pages/When-being-stingy-became-a-competitive-advantage.aspx

News | 12 Jun.2013

Spanish Municipalities pledge support for recycling ‘made in Europe’

The declared commitment of Fuenlabrada town council and of the Association of Municipalities of the Costa del Sol are two good examples to demonstrate that the recent amendment to the Spanish Waste Act, which promotes recycling ‘made in Europe’, is beginning to bear fruit.


Fuenlabrada town council has recently unanimously approved a proposal in which it commits to recycling ‘made in Europe’ and pledges that all the paper and board collected in the town will be recycled in Spanish or European paper mills. Fuenlabrada, with a population of over 200,000, is one of the largest towns in the Greater Madrid area and also has one of the youngest populations of all Spanish cities.

On a similar note, the Association of Municipalities of the Western Costa del Sol has included a pioneer requirement in its new contract for paper and board collection services that the concessionaire delivers all waste paper and board it collects to a paper mill within the European Union and also submits supporting documents to guarantee traceability of that waste. The Association provides services such as separate paper and board collection to almost 460,000 inhabitants in the province of Malaga. It groups eleven town councils from the Costa del Sol, including resorts such as Marbella, Torremolinos, Fuengirola, Benalmadena, Mijas, Estepona...

The possibility of prioritising recycling within the European Union was set down for the first time in Spanish legislation for town councils through the 2011 Waste Act, and in November 2012, an amendment was included in the Law that extends the possibility of championing recycling ‘made in Europe’ to all producers or initial holders of recyclable waste.

Currently in Spain, any large retailer, bank, hotel chain, service company, municipal council... can legally require that the final recycling of its waste materials be carried out in European paper mills. This new legislation shields ‘made in Europe’ recycling and affords Spanish generators the ability to decide on the final destination of their waste.

By developing a European recycling society through such initiatives, the EU Commission estimates that over 400,000 jobs would be created in Europe by 2020.

Six good reasons for prioritising end recycling of waste within the European Union:
1. Enhancement of the European recycling industry.
2. Creation of green employment in Europe.
3. Reduction of emissions associated with transporting waste.
4. Guarantee that recycling meets European environmental requirements.
5. Creation of wealth in the same place as the effort and investment to recover waste have been made.
6. Improved transparency and control in the recycling process, which will lead to greater consumer confidence.

What the Waste Act says:
Article 16.3: "With respect to waste that is elegible for recycling, public administrations may articulate mechanisms on a temporary basis to give priority to recycling within the European Union, when justified for environmental reasons."

New additional provision nº 16: “Producers or other initial holders of recyclable waste materials may give priority to it being treated completely within the European Union in order to avoid the environmental impact of its transport out of the Union, in accordance with the applicable regulations."

 

ASPAPEL Press Office
Tel.: +34 91 561 68 26
Ángeles Álvarez aalvarez@informacioneimagen.es
Marta Cerceño martacerceno@informacioneimagen.es

 

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News | 04 Jun.2013

Less than a month left to apply for the European Paper Recycling Award!

The fourth edition of the European Paper Recycling awards is well underway, with less than a month left before the application deadline (28 June 2013). We would like to remind you that the award is open to all organisations based in Europe: regional and national authorities, NGOs, associations but also schools, universities and companies.

If you think you have an innovative project or campaign (or if you have heard of one) that could challenge for the award, don’t wait any longer: get your efforts recognised! Register the project at http://www.paperforrecycling.eu/recycling-awards. The winner will also receive an original piece of paper artwork at the awards ceremony which will take place on 2 October at the European Parliament in Brussels. Travel costs to the ceremony will be covered for the winner.

Have a look at the members of the jury and our frequently asked questions. If you have any more questions about the award, please send an email to erpc@cepi.org.

We are looking forward to receiving more entries!

 


 

News | 03 Jun.2013

Simple paper recycling rules from the ERPC

Have you ever held a plastic spiral notebook or a used pizza box and wondered if it should go in the recycling bin? Did a windowed envelope end up in your waste bin because you didn’t have time to cut the window out, thinking that it should be removed? The European Paper Recovery Council (ERPC) recently published a poster with nine simple rules for paper recycling, which answers the above questions and more.

This campaign targets offices in particular, where paper can make up 90% of the waste generated. Often half the amount of paper an employee uses a year ends up as waste rather than being recycled. By diverting paper products from landfill and incineration, carbon is saved, and the life of fibres is extended over multiple life cycles.

The rules are simple and can make a big difference if applied. Even though currently every year 70% of all used paper in the EU is recycled, about 10 million tonnes of paper are still potentially available for recycling, enough to fill 100 football stadiums! There are many reasons for this, but one of them is ignorance as to how paper for recycling should be collected.

For example, many do not know that paper should not be shredded, as fibres are damaged, adding an unnecessary cost. There is no need to remove staples, paper clips etc from paper as the recycling processes are designed to remove them. You didn’t know about this either? Now you do! So next time you have doubts on whether or not a piece of paper is recyclable or not, just take a look at these 9 rules and act accordingly. You will participate in the creation of a more sustainable world.

For more information, please contact the ERPC Secretariat, Jori Ringman-Beck, at +32 2 627 49 19, erpc@cepi.org or visit www.paperforrecycling.eu.

 

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Publication | 06 May.2013

Simple paper recycling rules from the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC)

 

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Press Release | 02 Apr.2013

ERPC Launches Call for Candidates for European Paper Recycling Award 2013

Paper recycling initiatives are invited to apply for the fourth European Paper Recycling Award. NGOs, educational institutes, local authorities and industry have implemented many innovative projects to enhance paper recycling all over Europe but these initiatives are generally not well known. By promoting these initiatives and raising their profile with an award the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) recognises these efforts and hopes to inspire others to copy good practices. The award will identify projects, initiatives and campaigns that contribute to Europe‟s sustainability through activities supporting paper recycling.


“Recycling is the key to achieving sustainability in production and consumption in Europe. Paper recycling, in particular, contributes significantly to green growth, combating climate change and improving resource efficiency. This makes a valuable contribution to the environment”, explains Beatrice Klose, Chairperson of the ERPC.


Eligible projects, initiatives or campaigns will be evaluated based on the following criteria:
• Relevance and originality
• Achievements
• Possibility to reproduce the project
• Cost effectiveness


There are two award categories:
• Information & Education
• Technology improvement & R&D


The initiatives may be ongoing or completed, but they must already have started; however, not before January 2009. All entries must be submitted by Friday 28 June 2013 before midday Brussels time. To apply please go to www.paperforrecycling.eu/recycling-awards. Should you need some inspiration, the website also contains information from past awards.


An independent jury from across Europe will judge the entries in each category. The jury includes representatives from the European institutions as well as civic organisations and NGOs. European wide recognition of the winning candidate‟s efforts will be accompanied by an original piece of paper artwork, which will be officially handed over to the winners in an award ceremony at the European Parliament in Brussels.


For more information, please contact the ERPC Secretariat, Jori Ringman-Beck, at +32 2 627 49 19, +32 478 255070, erpc@cepi.org or visit www.paperforrecycling.eu.

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News | 18 Jan.2013

Spain’s Waste Act champions recycling ‘made in Europe’

Large retail outlets, banks, hotel chains, service companies, town councils … from now on all such entities are able to legally demand that their recyclable waste materials be finally recycled in Europe, according to the new Spanish Waste Act, which was passed on 29 November 2012.

According to David Barrio, director of Recycling at ASPAPEL, “this new legislation upholds the legality of Recycling ‘Made in Europe’ and gives Spanish generators of recyclable waste materials powers to decide on the final destination of their waste”.

The 2011 Waste Act was the first bill in the Spanish law to introduce the possibility of town councils giving priority to recycling within the European Union. Now, with the recently passed Law on urgent measures concerning environmental matters, which amends the previous Waste Act, the possibility of applying recycling in proximity and circular economy is extended to all producers or initial holders of recyclable waste.

The European recycling society and the circular economy
As David Barrio explains: “Thanks to proximity recycling, the European recycling society turns the 6 tonnes of waste that each European citizen produces in a year into an opportunity to create wealth and green employment in Europe, in a sustainable, efficient and environmentally responsible manner, thereby giving value to the significant efforts made across Europe in recent years in terms of waste recovery”.

Recycling all kinds of waste materials (paper, glass, metal…) and turning them into new products manufactured by the European industry leads to the creation of a circular economy, which in turn builds up a larger industrial sector and creates wealth and employment precisely where the efforts and investments have been made to set up efficient waste collection systems. Furthermore, it guarantees that all recycling will be carried out in accordance with stringent EU environmental requirements.

By developing a European Recycling Society through measures such as this new Spanish law, the EU estimates that over 400,000 jobs could be created in Europe between now and 2020.

The Spanish paper industry supports initiatives in favour of the circular economy
“The Spanish paper industry,” continues David Barrio, “supports this initiative in favour of the circular economy with our own significant and expanding recycling capacity. Nowadays, we are the second largest paper recycling industry in Europe - second only to Germany – a level that enables us to close our cycle by recycling all the used paper and board collected in the country”.


Six good reasons for promoting recycling within the European Union:

1. Support for the European recycling industry.
2. Creation of green employment in Europe.
3. Reduction of emissions associated with transport of waste.
4. Compliance of recycling with the European environmental requirements.
5. Creation of wealth in those areas where the efforts and investments have been made to improve waste collection.
6. Greater transparency and control over the recycling process, which in turn leads to enhanced consumer confidence.
 
Stated in the Spanish Waste Act
Article 16.3: "With regard to waste materials elegible for recycling, public administrations may articulate temporary mechanisms that give priority to recycling within the European Union when such recycling is justified on environmental grounds."

16th new additional provision: Recyclable Waste: “Producers and other initial holders of recyclable waste materials may give priority to their complete treatment within the European Union in order to prevent the environmental impact of transporting waste out of the EU, in accordance with applicable regulations."

 ASPAPEL (Spanish Association of Pulp and Paper Manufacturers) is a nationwide professional organization that brings together companies in the pulp and paper sector. Associated member companies (about 60) account for over 90% of the Spanish sector’s total output.


ASPAPEL Press Office - Tel.: +34 91 561 68 26
Ángeles Álvarez aalvarez@informacioneimagen.es
Marta Cerceño martacerceno@informacioneimagen.es
 

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