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15 Feb.2017

ETS: on the right track but pitfalls remain

Following today’s vote at plenary on the Emissions Trading System the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is overall encouraged by the compromise text reached. There is much in the agreement that the industry can be positive about, retaining many of the key components of the compromise text agreed the Environment committee (ENVI) stage.
 

The ETS has moved a step further on its pro-investment track. Although pitfalls still remain at Council level we are confident that the current text can be improved on” says Nicola Rega, Energy and Climate Change Director at CEPI
 

The industry commends several key aspects of the Parliament’s decision:
• Reemphasising the need for all sectors to contribute to reducing carbon emissions
• Encouragement of early movers investing in low-carbon technologies
• Maintaining flexibility in setting the auction share
• A first step in finding solutions to help member states with compensation for indirect carbon costs
• The development of a wider-ranging fund for innovation supporting industry transition towards a low-carbon economy

Unfortunately, the macro-agreement at the core of the decision by the Parliament still maintains traces of discrimination between sectors, ultimately rewarding those investing the least in carbon emission reductions. But we are confident that this environmentally and legally questionable element will be removed as the next stage of the negotiations. This would guarantee that fairness remains a core component of the ETS.

For more information, please contact Nicola Rega at n.rega@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 485 40 34 12

For press related enquiries, please contact Ben Kennard at b.kennard@cepi.org or by phone at (+32 487 39 21 82)

 

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08 Feb.2017

Preliminary statistics for 2016 published

CEPI has published its preliminary statistics for 2016.

You can find below a summary of the main findings below. Download the publication.

• Paper and board production has decreased by 0.1% in 2016 compared to the previous year. Total production in 2016 was around 91 million tonnes.

• Early estimates indicate that world paper and board production will be up by 0.8% in 2016 to reach 410 million tonnes.

• The production of packaging grades is estimated to have increased by around 2.3% compared to 2015. Within the packaging grades, case materials - mainly used for transport packaging and corrugated boxes - recorded an increase in production of 2.2%

• Sanitary and household manufacturers are estimated to have seen an increase in output of about 1.8% compared to 2015 and accounted for 8.1% of total production.

• Weak printing and publishing activities continue to have an impact on the overall production of graphic grades, which fell by around 3.7%. Output of newsprint - used mainly for daily newspapers - is expected to fall around 6.4%.

• Preliminary indications are that imports of paper and board into Europe have increased by around 6% compared to 2015.

• The overall consumption of paper and board in CEPI countries in 2016 increased by 1% compared to 2015

• It is estimated that the production of pulp (integrated + market) has increased by 0.7% compared to the previous year, with total output of approximately 36.5 million tonnes

• The use of paper for recycling has fallen by around 0.3% when compared to 2015

The finalised version of our statistics (Key Statistics 2016) will be available on our site on July of this year.
 

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31 Jan.2017

Energy-intensive sectors call on MEPs to reject any "tiered approach"

We, the signatories of this paper, energy-intensive sectors representing about 2 million jobs in the EU and comprising many SME’s, are under direct impact of the EU ETS and are recognized as exposed to carbon, investment and employment leakage.

We ask Members of the European Parliament to acknowledge the mutual importance of our sectors for the EU economy, in particular for European jobs in your constituencies, and all our economic value chains by fully rejecting any “tiered approach” to free allocation and voting against it.

In order to ensure an equal level playing field for all energy-intensive industries, we call for the rejection of all approaches which aim at discriminating a few from other sectors exposed to carbon leakage risks, namely: the “tiered approach” to free allowance allocation, the “tiered CSCF” and the “import inclusion mechanism”.

This discrimination between industrial sectors goes against the principle set in the October European Council Conclusions that best performing companies in ETS carbon leakage sectors should not bear further carbon costs. Indeed, it would ensure that even best performers in most sectors would bear significant carbon costs.

We appreciate that all policy makers want to avoid undue carbon costs to industry and the triggering of the cross-sectoral correction factor (CSCF, reduces benchmark-based allocation to undertakings). The fairest and most effective way to provide eligible companies with the allowances needed for controlling the carbon leakage risk and still avoiding the CSCF is to increase the free allocation share and to reduce the auctioning volume accordingly. However, we are concerned by the ENVI proposal to exclude only certain sectors from the application of the CSCF, via the so-called “tiered CSCF”. Other sectors in turn would be severely undersupplied. Again this approach would arbitrarily differentiate between different European industries. Protection of some sectors should not be achieved at the expense of the others. Such segregation would also bring into question the environmental integrity of the scheme.

Moreover, we are alarmed by the late introduction of an entirely new proposal for an “import inclusion mechanism” for sectors with lower trade intensity. This is discriminatory, legally questionable and would limit the ability of certain sectors to compete on a level playing field. The notion is contrary to the principal idea of the carbon leakage risk assessment being based on two main criteria (trade intensity and CO2 intensity) as the “import inclusion mechanism” only considers the former. Finally, it goes against the Paris Agreement which does not contain any suggestions allowing for unilateral trade measures. Overall, it introduces a major change to the future of the ETS scheme increasing the legal uncertainty for the ETS reform post 2020.

We reiterate our opposition to any differentiation between the energy intensive industries and under any form of the “tiered approach” and ask you to reject it in the Plenary.

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26 Jan.2017

A year into the project, IMPACTPapeRec consolidates efforts to increase separate paper collection in Europe

The successful Horizon 2020 IMPACTPapeRec Project Conference united more than 50 professionals from across Europe and debated the ways to increase separate paper collection in the EU, a key element in Europe’s transition towards a Circular Economy. The event took place in Barcelona (Spain) on 24 January. 

IMPACTPapeRec brings together the whole paper value chain for the first time in a joint project with the two-fold goal of promoting separate collection of “Paper for Recycling” and avoiding landfilling and incineration, particularly in countries with a low recycling rate. The event constitutes a step further in that direction.

In the past year, project partners exchanged views with paper collection decision-makers from seven municipalities ranging from the U.K to Romania, Poland, Bulgaria and France and mapped out the current waste management systems in Europe.

The mapping, presented at the conference, revealed major differences in challenges between countries with a well-established recycling system and those where such a system is still being implemented. In addition, citizen awareness and motivation was a recurring topic throughout the event.

In order to enhance the discussion, key experts spoke about the importance of quality of Paper for Recycling, efficiency of payment systems and incentives to encourage recycling, as well as the sensitive issue of informal paper collection outside officially-established waste management systems.

In addition, the partners presented some of the identified best practices, which will undergo a deeper analysis throughout the months to come. Participants also participated in a world-café format informative meeting, sharing their views on critical issues such as standardisation and policymaking developments.
Paper collection is a multi-dimensional issue and finding a stand-alone solution is not possible”, said Antonio Dobón, project coordinator from ITENE. “We are confident that the project will help us find the right ways to promote paper collection wherever we can”.

The project will come to an end in January 2018 with a final conference organised in Brussels. Until then, the 19 partners will continue to work towards achieving the project’s objectives. A number of the best practices identified will be selected, leading to the publication of an informational web-based “handbook“, a practical guide to help municipalities achieve better collection rates.

You can find further information and photos from the event at www.impactpaperec.eu
 

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24 Jan.2017

ENVI committee vote: one step closer towards a truly circular economy in and for Europe

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) welcomes today’s vote in Environment Committee (ENVI) strengthening the foundation of a truly circular economy in Europe.
MEPs are now one step closer to building a truly circular economy” says Sylvain Lhôte, CEPI Director General. “The package needs to be kept on the right track in order to deliver the circular economy in and for Europe".

CEPI welcomes ENVI’s call to measure real recycling rates at the input to the final recycling process. To truly drive circularity in Europe, it is essential that material is only considered recycled once it enters the final production process and is actually reprocessed.

CEPI also supports the ENVI’s call for quality standards and traceability in the paper recycling chain that will enhance targeted investments and serve the efficient functioning of the secondary raw material market in Europe.

The reinforcement of separate collection will also drive quality recycling and boost circularity of Europe’s economy. In the past, authorities have used a loophole in the separate collection obligation to collect paper in co-mingled streams, undermining high quality recycling. CEPI is therefore concerned that the proposal to exempt scarcely populated areas from this obligation may unnecessarily open up a gap.

CEPI will further assess the extremely high gap between recycling targets of competing packaging materials, envisioned by MEPs.

Finally, CEPI is also encouraged by ENVI’s call on Member States to promote the use of bio-based recyclable packaging. “Leveraging on nature’s cycles for the circular economy is a welcome complement to the ambition of the Commission’s proposal” says Ulrich Leberle, CEPI Raw Materials Director.
 

For more information, please contact Ulrich Leberle at u.leberle@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 2 62749 23

For press related enquiries please contact Ben Kennard at b.kennard@cepi.or by phone at (+32) 487 39 21 82
 

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18 Jan.2017

IMPACTPapeRec Project Conference

• The European project IMPACTPapeRec will bring together about 70 professionals on 24 January in Barcelona (Spain), to focus on the challenges and opportunities for increasing separate collection of paper in EU countries.

• Experts from STORAENSO, CEPI, ASPAPEL, SPRINGLOOP COOPERATIE, INTECUS, ACR+, DIN, PROPAKMA, PTS and ITENE will analysebest practices across Europe, optimum quality of Paper for Recycling, payment systems’ efficiency depending on the quantity of residues produced and incentives to recycling, as well as the issue of non-legally-established paper collection waste management systems.

• The Packaging, Transport and Logistics Research Center (ITENE) organises the event as the coordinator of the IMPACTPapeRec project. The project is supported by the EU Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program and consists of a consortium of 19 partners from 8 European countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Poland, Romania and Spain.

Consumption of paper and board in the EU stands at 82 million tonnes, 58 million of which are recycled to make new paper and board products. 47 million tones are recycled in Europe and 11 in other countries, meaning a paper recycling rate of 71.7% in Europe, according to the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI).
ITENE, IMPACTPapeRec coordinator, organises the first “Project Conference and Networking Informative Meeting” with the objective of further increasing the separate collection of paper for recycling and promoting appropriate schemes to avoid landfilling and incineration.

The event will be held on 24 January in Barcelona and it will bring together more than 70 professionals to attend experts’ presentations from STORAENSO, CEPI, ASPAPEL, SPRINGLOOP COOPERATIE, INTECUS, ACR +, DIN, PROPAKMA, PTS and ITENE.

First, participants will learn about the current state of selective collection of Paper for Recycling in Europe, including the main challenges and opportunities identified in different EU countries as well as best practices already in place. The optimal quality of Paper for Recycling and collection will also be discussed, as well as experts’ opinions on incentives for recycling and pay-as-you-through systems efficacy, plus the issue of informal paper collection that is not part of the legally established systems. 

After the Conference, during the Networking Informative Meeting attendees will be asked to share their ideas and opinions on good practices, incentives, policy making and standardisation actions needed to increase the selective collection of Paper for Recycling and its quality in Europe.
The audience will include stakeholders involved in recycling and sustainability issues working in the paper industry, municipalities across the EU, waste management companies, policy makers, standardization odies and citizen associations.

Attendance to the Conference and Networking Meeting is free of charge. You can find further information and registration details at www.impactpaperec.eu

Note to editor

 The IMPACTPapeRec project is financed by the European Union Horizon 2020 Programme and supports the separate collection of paper commitment of the European Innovation Platform (EIP) in New Materials.

ITENE coordinates the project consortium formed by 19 partners from eight European countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Poland, Romania and Spain.
IMPACTPapeRec aims to put Europe at the forefront of paper for recycling (PfR) collection by providing an innovative and common knowledge platform. The innovative approach of the defined participatory strategy is based on the real engagement of the whole paper value chain including research, industry, policies, standards, municipalities and citizens.
 

 

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16 Jan.2017

Test Exemptions now included in Deinking Scorecard

The recently-revised deinkability scorecard by the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) now includes an annex listing exemptions to the deinkability test. With this annex, the widely-used deinkability scorecard takes account of those printing technologies and material combinations that are sure to deliver good deinkability results, based on past experiences. Testing remains a requirement for processes and material combinations for which there is not enough experience on their deinkability behaviour. The annex will be subject to future revisions based on new data.

The ERPC approach to deinkability, i.e. by testing and assessing results with a scorecard on the one hand and by exempting certain paper / printing technology combinations on the other hand is an effective way to secure high quality recycling while being cost-effective for the producers of printed products” says Henri Vermeulen, ERPC Chairman.

Recent suggestions that the European Commission would not extend EU Ecolabel for tissue paper and newsprint among others give reason to believe that other paper-related Ecolabels are also under threat. These could include the Ecolabel on printed paper products, where deinkability is one criterion. “Deinking is an important part of the recycling process and therefore a key issue for the sustainability of printed paper products. The EU Ecolabel is a strong supporter of their recycling and their recyclability. We urge policymakers to recognise the tangible value of the EU Ecolabel” says Ulrich Leberle, ERPC secretary.

The new deinking scorecard is available here

For more information, please contact the ERPC Secretariat, Ulrich Leberle, at
+32 2 627 49 23, +32 479 90 59 21, erpc@cepi.org or visit www.paperforrecycling.eu


Notes to Editor:

The European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) was set up as an industry self-initiative in November 2000 to monitor progress towards meeting the paper recycling targets set out in the 2000 European Declaration on Paper Recycling. Since then the commitments in the Declaration are renewed every five years. In 2001 the ERPC committed itself to meeting and maintaining both a voluntary recycling rate target of 70% in the EU27 plus Switzerland and Norway by 2015 as well as qualitative targets in areas such as waste prevention, ecodesign, and research and development. In 2016, Members of the ERPC are ACE, CEPI, CITPA, EMFA, ERPA, ETS, FEPE, INGEDE and INTERGRAF. Supporters are Afera, EuPIA, FINAT and RADTECH Europe. The European Commission, DG Environment and DGGrow, are permanent observers to the ERPC.
 

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19 Dec.2016

Letter to the European Commission President Juncker and First Vice-President Timmermans: Concerns on the potential discontinuation of EU Ecolabel product groups

We, European paper manufacturers, retailers and wholesalers, consumer organisations and environmental NGOs, are writing to share our concerns about the possible removal of a number of EU Ecolabel product groups[1] which we understand the Commission is considering. In our view, such a unilateral and unexpected consideration would be premature, given the ongoing Fitness Check of the EU Ecolabel Regulation, and we urge the Commission to reconsider the possible discontinuation of these product groups.

The Commission has recognised the EU Ecolabel as an “incentive scheme in favour of the market” which can benefit consumers and boost job creation[2]. This voluntary, market-based instrument is also consistent with, and complementary to, other EU policies concerning the circular economy and sustainable development[3].

The Commission has suggested discontinuing some product groups that include two relatively successful EU Ecolabel paper-related products (tissue and newsprint). Such a discontinuation would have the following consequences:

1. Environmental benefits would be reduced: Narrowing the scope and the uptake of the scheme will reduce its positive effects as a sign-post for product sustainability in areas ranging from biodiversity to water and energy efficiency or chemicals and raw materials management.

2. A proliferation of labels could lead to additional confusion among consumers: The Ecolabel is designed to help EU citizens make sustainable purchases, with a range of almost 40,000 environmentally more friendly products and services, of which one quarter are paper-related. Consumers already face a wide variety of labels, and a credible EU Ecolabel allows them to buy with more confidence. Having no EU Ecolabel for paper may result in a further proliferation of private or national schemes. Such schemes are likely to use slightly differing criteria and contain protectionist national features, hampering the functioning of the EU single market.

3. Business would face significant costs: Both the tissue and newsprint EU Ecolabels have generated several billions of euros in sales every year. Companies have invested significantly to be able to use the EU Ecolabel on their products which has helped companies market these products across the EU and access green public procurement with fewer administrative burdens. Such market uptake takes time and perseverance. Dropping these labels would lead to extra costs for such companies, as for example existing packaging materials of EU Ecolabelled products would need to be modified, and would create market uncertainty.

The Commission’s suggestion to prematurely remove specific product groups in isolation raises questions not only over the evidence used, but also on the process, governance and stakeholder consultation as set under the EU Ecolabel Regulation. This also seems to us incompatible with the Commission’s Better Regulation guidelines issued last year.
We therefore urge the Commission to:

- Reconsider any suggested discontinuation of specific product groups at this point in time;

- Underpin with clear evidence, such as produced by the Fitness check, any decision on the fate of the ecolabels for specific product groups and the future of the scheme;

- Make the consultation process transparent, involving the EU Ecolabelling Board and stakeholders from manufacturing, retail and consumer organisations.

We remain at your disposal for any questions you might have and to further discuss any issues related to the future of the EU Ecolabel.

Yours sincerely,

Sylvain Lhôte, Director General Confederation of European Paper Industries

Roberto Berardi, Chairman, European Tissue Symposium 

Monique Goyens, Director General, The European Consumer Organisation

Jeremy Wates, Secretary General, European Environmental Bureau

Christian Verschueren, Director General, Eurocommerce

Note to editor:

For more information please contact:

CEPI: Jori Ringman, Sustainability Director by e-mail at j.ringman@cepi.org or by phone at

ETS: Phil Mogel, Relation Manager, at info@europeantissue.com

BEUC & EEB: Blanca Morales, EU Ecolabel Coordinator at Blanca.Morales@beuc.eu

Eurocommerce: Lettemieke Mulder, Director Sustainability & Product Policy at mulder@eurocommerce.eu

 

 

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15 Dec.2016

ETS review: Game over for Tiered Approach

Today’s vote in Environment Committee of the European Parliament marks another major stepping stone for the ETS review.

“There are no more doubts. The message from the Parliament is unequivocal: Game over for the tiered approach. The time has come to promote and reward low-carbon investments” says Nicola Rega, Climate Change and Energy Director at the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI).

The vote reinforces the decisions already taken by the European Parliament’s Committee on Industry, Research and Energy in mid-October. It underlines the need for all sectors to contribute in reducing carbon emissions; flexibility in setting the auction share; a pragmatic solution to help member states with compensation for indirect carbon costs, and a wider-ranging fund for innovation.

The broad range of political support reached proves that the difficulties negotiators faced over the last months were worth it. We therefore fully congratulate the rapporteur, Ian Duncan, and the shadow rapporteurs Ivo Belet, Jytte Guteland, Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy, Kateřina Konečná, Eleonora Evi, Bas Eickhout and Mireille d’Ornano for their commitment to achieving a common position.
Although these are positive developments, a lot still needs to be achieved ahead of the Council negotiations. In particular, the solutions to address the impact of the cross-sectoral correction factor are far from satisfactory. The attempt to shield more than 50% of industrial emissions from this mechanism is unjustifiable from an environmental, economic and equitable perspective. It doubles the uncertainty connected to the CSCF for less carbon intensive sectors and limits their investment security for low carbon investments. In addition, the last-minute solution to include a border adjustment mechanism into the ETS raises more questions than answers.

A significant investment challenge lies ahead for European manufacturing industry to transform its production base and regain competitiveness. With our positive attitude we will constructively continue to engage with policy-makers to ensure that the ETS will work as a tool to reward low-carbon investments. It is high time we put the ETS on a pro-investment track.

For more information, please contact Nicola Rega at n.rega@cepi.org or by phone at: +32 485 40 34 12
 

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05 Dec.2016

CEPI increases focus on technical measurement in revised Paper for Recycling Quality Control guidelines

CEPI has published an updated version of the ‘Paper for Recycling – Quality control guidelines’ including an annex which outlines in more detail the technical measurements.
The updated version is the result of sustained industry consultation and as a step towards achieving a harmonised approach on quality control and measurement. The additional annex provides more detailed information on:

1. Instrumental analysis via automatic sensor Near Infra-Red (NIR)
2. Instrumental analysis via automatic microwave sensor

The updated guidelines were first launched in April 2016 with the objective to improve the implementation of the revised EN 643 Standard and to facilitate commercial relationships of paper mills with their suppliers of paper for recycling.

“The inclusion of the annex reflects the trend of paper companies increasingly using technical measurement in their quality control. The focus on quality is crucial for the functioning of secondary raw material markets and makes paper recycling a role model for the circular economy.” says Massimo Medugno, Director General of Assocarta, CEPI’s member in Italy.

While CEPI remains actively engaged in the ongoing standardisation process on the sampling of paper for recycling, the present guidelines are much wider in scope.

They put strong emphasis on the inspection procedure for quality control at the paper mill and explain what controllers should consider during an inspection in order to decide if a load should be accepted, conditionally accepted or refused. The control procedure recommended is described in detail and illustrated by a ‘decision tree’ at the end of the document.

CEPI strongly encourages its member companies to apply the new guidelines in the purchasing Paper for Recycling market.
English and French versions of the revised Guidelines can be consulted on our website here.
 

For more information, please contact: Ulrich Leberle, Raw Materials Director at CEPI: u.leberle@cepi.org, +32 2 627 49 23
 

For press related enquiries please contact: Ben Kennard, Press & Digital Media Officer at CEPI: b.kennard@cepi.org , +32 487 39 21 82

Note to the Editor

The European Standard EN 643, European List of Standard Grades of Paper and Board for Recycling, is the basic document to be used by industry professionals in the buying and selling of paper for recycling. Interested parties should order the EN 643 from their respective national standardisation body. The standard was revised in 2014. It defines what the different grades of paper for recycling can and cannot contain as well as defining prohibited materials and unwanted materials. It also sets maximum tolerance levels by grade for unwanted materials.

 

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