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17 May.2017

European paper industry reaction to Fertilizers Europe “alternative facts” in “Allowances balance calculation in the EU ETS” Ecofys report

On 15 May 2017 Ecofys published the report “Allowances balance calculation in the EU ETS”, commissioned by Fertilizers Europe.

The document is full of omissions in data collection and analysis. Although the authors acknowledge such shortcomings throughout the whole report, they still conclude that, even with improved accuracy “by performing an extensive data collection […] it is expected that the main conclusions of this study would remain the same”. In other words: the results would be the same, regardless of facts and figures.

Such a statement would be sufficient to disregard this alleged “objective study”.

Yet in CEPI we are strongly convinced that facts and figures are essential to developing informed decisions. CEPI facts and figures are backed by our in-house statistical team and are third-party verified. We believe this ethos should equally apply to others.

As the Ecofys document is built on an impressive amount of misleading or “adjusted” information, we believe it is imperative to rectify the claims against the pulp and paper industry:

1. Sector definition and cross-boundary heat flows

A whopping 20% of additional carbon emissions for our industry are not accounted for in the Ecofys report.

In the ETS, emissions from heat are allocated to the heat consumer, not the heat producer (where emissions effectively take place). Heat-related emissions are thus not counted under the ETS registry codes “pulp and paper” but under “combustion installation”, even if these emissions happen within the perimeter of the industrial site.

The impact of these emissions is massive: the sector actually moves from having a surplus to having a shortage of allocations[1].

Ecofys is well aware of the impact heat flows calculations has on industry allocation, particularly for the pulp and paper industry. Yet, it decides to disregard them, concluding that “indicatively” the pulp and paper industry has “an allowance surplus that carries long into phase IV”.

Clearly, by using “alternative facts”, anything can be “indicatively assumed”. 

2. Emission levels in Phase III

Despite concrete achievements, our sector’s emission reductions have not matched the allocation reductions induced by the cross-sectoral correction factor. For example, in 2016 only our sector was 4% under-allocated.

Our sector is under-allocated and, unless major disruptions happen, will remain so until at least 2020. The regulatory impact post-2020 is still unknown.

Any increase in allocation surplus for our sector, as illustrated in the Ecofys report from 2014 to 2020, is unreal and unrealistic.

3. Emissions carried over from Phase II

First and foremost, the above-mentioned cross-border heat flow applies also here. The figures lack data on emissions from combustion installations in the paper industry. Had these figures been taken into consideration, they would have shown a cumulative surplus in line with other industrial sectors. This comes to no surprise as the pulp and paper industry, like all industries, was heavily hit by the economic and financial crisis.

Moreover, at the beginning of Phase II, in 2008, the pulp and paper industry had 872 open permits in the ETS. In 2013, at the beginning of phase III the open permits were reduced to 825.

Many of the installations that closed were small and medium enterprises, often family-owned. When an installation closes those allowances are gone: either released to the market or cancelled. There is no intra-company transfer.

Unused allowances released to the market could be in anyone’s account, including in fertilizer companies.
Assuming that all those allowances remained at the disposal of the pulp and paper industry for future use, painting the image that the sector is sitting on an immense amount of unused credits, is purely fictional.

4. Carbon intensity improvements (past, present, future)

The pulp and paper industry is proud of the achievements reached in reducing carbon emissions over the past years. Since 2005, when the ETS began, we have reduced our carbon intensity by around 21%.

This was the result of real investments and it lead to the creation of jobs and growth. In the recent years we have been investing 3.5 bn €/year, including investments in energy efficiency and higher use of renewable energy sources.

In fact, in some countries we have even achieved an impressive 75% emission reduction since 2005, without jeopardising international competitiveness.

The Ecofys report, on the contrary, retroactively assumes no historic emission intensity improvement occurred. Nor future emission intensity improvements are foreseen.

We strongly disagree.

5. The misplaced logic of “improvements are not possible”

The carbon footprint of the pulp and paper industry is already very low (0.7%of EU GHG emissions) and will further reduce.

We see tremendous potential in linking the low-carbon economy to the bioeconomy and the circular economy. Our mills are already producing cost-effective low carbon solutions to replace carbon intensive products.

For instance, looking at fertilisers:
• Bio-based fertilisers → ETS benchmark: 0.02 - 0.12 tCO2/t (pulp)
• Fossil-based fertilisers → ETS benchmark: 1.619 tCO2/t (ammonia)

There is definitely some untapped potential to be exploited!

The Ecofys report, on the contrary, assumes no improvement in carbon-intensity both in the past and the future. Meaning rewarding incumbents and putting up barriers to innovation.

We strongly disagree.

In conclusion

Climate change is a serious threat, and needs to be treated seriously. We need to refocus on investments in the EU economy, driving the transition towards a low-carbon economy where Europe leads by example

Within this context, the ETS needs to promote and reward those investing in low-carbon technologies and solutions.

All sectors are important and should be treated equally. And they all need to contribute.

The clock is ticking and 2021 is just around the corner. We need to close the ETS negotiations as soon as possible, to give industry the regulatory predictability needed to start planning the next wave of low-carbon investments.
 

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11 May.2017

New 74% paper recycling target set for 2020

The European paper recycling value chain has already made significant strides on the paper recycling rate in the EU, having reached a near theoretical maximum of 71.5% in 2015. The industry is now seeking to make another move forward with an enhanced rate of 74% by 2020 building on the progress achieved since 2000 by preceding European Declarations on Paper Recycling.

Having already achieved an effective recycling rate of 71.5%, the European paper recycling value chain is willing to go a step further with a new 74% target. This elevated rate will play an integral role in boosting the circularity of Europe’s economy” says Ulrich Leberle, Secretary of the EPRC/Raw Materials Director at CEPI.

Further steps will also be made to enhance the quality of paper recycling with greater emphasis on recyclability in design and manufacturing of paper products and improving techniques for removing ink from paper products.

In order to achieve this rate, a numberm of key conditions must be in place:

  • On waste targets, there should be a landfill ban on recycled paper in place by 2020 and the Waste Hierarchy should be implemented with energy and renewable energy policies taken into full consideration.
  • The EU should ensure that conditions are in place to allow for effective separate collection of paper and take action against countries where comingled collection is practised.
  • Exports of paper for recycling outside the EU should be curtailed and aligned in a manner that an increase in the collection of paper is higher than an increase in the net trade of paper for recycling.
  • European and national authorities should avoid conflicting product-related policies that prevent paper being from being recycled.
  • The current practice in which Member-States calculate their recycling rates based on different methods should cease in favour of an aligned EU-wide method, allowing for comparable and real calculation.

With these conditions in place, the entire value chain can achieve the revised target and move it a step further, making recycling work for an effective European circular economy.

For more information, please contact Ulrich Leberle at u.leberle@cepi.org or by phone at (+32 262 7 49 23).

For press related enquiries, please contact Ben Kennard at b.kennard@cepi.org or by phone at (+32 487 39 21 82).

Note to editor: The European Paper Recycling Council (EPRC) was set up as an industry self-initiative in November 2000 to monitor progress towards meeting the paper recycling targets set out in the 2000 European Declaration on Paper Recycling. Since then the commitments in the Declaration are renewed every five years. In 2017 the EPRC committed itself to meeting and maintaining both a voluntary recycling rate target of 74% in the EU27 plus Switzerland and Norway by 2020 as well as qualitative targets in areas such as waste prevention, ecodesign and research and development. In 2017, Members of the ERPC are ACE, CEPI, CITPA, EMFA, ETS, FEPE, INGEDE and INTERGRAF. Supporters are Afera, EuPIA, FINAT and RadTECH Europe. The European Commission, DG Environment and DG Grow, are permanent observers to the EPRC.

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02 May.2017

Recycling the European Paper Recycling Awards, entries now being accepted for the 6th edition!

The 6th edition of the European Paper Recycling Awards will take place the 18th October in the European Parliament hosted by europarliamentarian Ms. Simona Bonafè, rapporteur of the Circular Economy package and champion of the importance of recycling.

The Awards provide an occasion to shed the spotlight on the innovative projects changing the way we think and do paper recycling and help Europe achieve its goal of a 74% paper recycling rate by 2020.

Any paper recycling related project or campaign can now be submitted here to be within a chance of headlining this year’s Award.
 

There are two categories for submission and a separate award will be granted for each category:

1) Information & Education
2) Innovative technologies and R&D
The awards are open to all entities based in Europe including schools, universities, NGOs, national and regional authorities, companies and associations.
 

Application deadline: Monday 3 July 2017
Further details can be consulted on the FAQ page here

The European Paper Recycling Awards are run by the European Paper Recycling Council (EPRC) which encompasses the entire paper recycling value chain across Europe. To learn more about the EPRC and its activities and how its plans to get Europe’s recycling rates to 74% by 2020 check out their website here.
 

For further information please contact Annie Xystouris at a.xystouris@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 322 6 274 924
 

For press related enquiries please contact Ben Kennard at b.kennard@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 487 39 21 82
 

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24 Apr.2017

European paper industry lodges complaint against unfair Turkish import licensing on EU exports of office paper

CEPI (the Confederation of European Paper Industries) has presented a Trade Barrier Regulation (“TBR”) complaint to the European Commission against the unfair non-automatic import licensing system established by Turkey concerning, inter alia, EU exports of uncoated wood free (“UWF”) paper, which includes office paper, books, envelopes and paper used for direct mail marketing.

Following an inconclusive safeguard investigation on UWF imports in 2014-2015, Turkey extended in 2016 an existing import licensing system which targeted €150 million of EU exports of UWF paper products.

The Turkish non-automatic import licensing system with regard to UWF paper is based on an arbitrary price threshold and creates a significant and unfair obstacle to EU-Turkey trade. As such, the contested system poses a clear violation of WTO and EU-Turkey Customs Union Agreement which the Commission is currently seeking to strengthen.

The European pulp and paper industry exports more than 20% of its production worldwide. It is essential that the EU ensures with all its trading partners the full respect of free trade and fair competition rules we have in bilateral agreements like with Turkey and at WTO level” say Sylvain Lhôte

For more information, please contact Bernard Lombard at b.lombard@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 2 627 49 22

For press related enquiries, please contact Ben Kennard at b.kennard@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 487 39 21 82

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09 May.2017

Recycling the ‘R’ in ERPC, the European Recovered Paper Council becomes the European Paper Recycling Council (EPRC)

To align with its new “Declaration on Paper Recycling” the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) has been renamed the European Paper Recycling Council (EPRC). The name change also takes into consideration the use of the term of paper for recycling rather than recovered paper in the updated European Standard List of Grades of Paper and Board for Recycling (EN 643).

To coincide with the launch of the new title and identity, a more user-friendly website is now live and includes additional information on the EPRC’s activities and more on its plan to meet its new paper recycling rate target of 74% by 2020.

The chairmanship of the EPRC has also rotated accordingly with the confirmation of Lisa Kretschmann, Managing Director of the European Federation of Envelope Manufacturers (FEPE) as new chairperson for the 2016-2020 commitment/monitoring period. “I am delighted to have been selected as the new chairperson of the ERPC at a time where the European paper recycling value-chain seeks to surpass new boundaries with its revised target of 74% paper recycling rate. I am confident that the rebranding will provide the EPRC with an opportunity to relaunch the debate on how to achieve effective paper recycling across Europe” says Lisa Kretschmann

The EPRC is also now accepting applications for the 6th edition of the European Paper Recycling Awards, hosted by member of the European Parliament Ms. Simona Bonafè. Full information including eligibility criteria can be consulted here.

For more information, please contact Ulrich Leberle at u.leberle@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 627 49 23

For press related enquiries, please contact Ben Kennard at b.kennard@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 487 39 21 82

Note to editor:

The European Recycled Paper Council (ERPC) was set up as an industry self-initiative in November 2000 to monitor progress towards meeting the paper recycling targets set out in the 2000 European Declaration on Paper Recycling. Since then the commitments in the Declaration are renewed every 5 years. In 2017 the ERPC committed itself to meeting and maintaining a voluntary recycling rate target of 74% in the EU27 plus Switzerland and Norway by 2020 as well as qualitative targets in areas such as waste prevention, ecodesign, and research and development. In 2017, Members of the ERPC are ACE, CEPI, CITPA, EMFA, ERPA, ETS, FEPE, INGEDE and INTERGRAF. Supporters are Afera, EuPIA, FINAT and RadTECH Europe. The European Commission, DG Environment and DG Grow, are permanent observers to the ERPC.

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10 Apr.2017

CEPI celebrates 25 years with a special logo!

CEPI was founded in 1992 and is celebrating 25 years of existence this year. We have several projects in the pipeline to celebrate this anniversary, most of them cumulating during European Paper Week in Brussels on 28-30 November 2017. The commemorative logo is based on the experiences paper can offer for all five senses. The five colours correspond to: Sight (yellow, sun, lights), Taste (orange, experience, adventure), Touch (magenta, soft, warm), Sound (purple, surprising, elusive) and Smell (blue, fresh, air). You will experience these at EPW…So stay tuned!

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21 Mar.2017

Global Forest and Paper Industry Celebrates International Day of Forests

SÃO PAULO – The theme of the 2017 United Nations International Day of Forests is Forests and Energy. The International Council of Forest and Paper Associations (ICFPA) of which CEPI is a member is proud to represent the global forest products industry, which plays an important role in contributing to the production of renewable energy. While manufacturing its products from wood sourced from sustainably managed forests, the industry reduces dependence on fossil fuels. It uses by wood manufacturing residuals, byproducts and forest residues – collectively known as biomass – to produce efficiently much of the energy required for its operations and provides heat to local communities as well as to electrify the grid.

According to the international carbon accounting principle, when combusted for energy, biomass does not contribute to global climate change as growing trees sequester carbon from the atmosphere via photosynthesis. The ICFPA reiterates the carbon neutrality of biomass in a policy statement here

The sustainable management of forestry including the efficient use of biomass for energy is key to achieving global climate change commitments and are core principles in making the low-carbon bioeconomy a reality in Europe.” says Sylvain Lhôte, Director General at CEPI

According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, wood provides the world with roughly 40 percent of current global renewable energy supply – more than solar, hydroelectric or wind power. Sustainably-managed forests have a key role in meeting several United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and providing solutions for a growing green economy.

To increase the role of forests in providing renewable energy and to reduce the use of fossil fuels, the forest-based industry invests in technological innovation and sustainably-managed forests to improve yields and practices. In the past ten years, the energy share of biomass and other renewable fuels has increased ten percentage points from 53 to 63 percent.

The ICFPA represents more than 30 national and regional forest and paper associations around the world, including CEPI
For more information about the sustainability of the global forest and paper industry, visit icfpa.org.

 

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14 Mar.2017

Made to measure ‘real’ recycling rates will target investment where it matters most

The European Parliament has today opted to follow the ambitious lead set by Environment committee’s vote on the Circular Economy package in January this year.

The most important outcome from today’s vote is that MEPs moved in favour of one single calculation method that enshrines real and comparable recycling rates both in and for Europe.

“Today, the European Parliament has fully grasped the opportunity to make the Circular Economy work for Europe by enabling industry and local authorities to better target where investment needs to take place” says CEPI Director General Sylvain Lhôte

CEPI recognises that the new recycling targets are ambitious while providing new opportunities in terms of improving quality.

“For an industry where over half of our feedstock comes from paper for recycling, the Parliament’s approach means greater use of raw materials whilst putting the emphasis on quality” says CEPI Raw Materials Director Ulrich Leberle

The vote to encourage the use of bio-based packaging also demonstrates the importance of a Circular Economy that builds upon Europe’s wealth of renewable resources while accelerating the transition towards a low-carbon economy.

Finally the continued assertion of the separate collection of paper is viewed by the European paper and board industry as a means to bridge ambitious targets with higher quality recycling.

CEPI together with other partners in the European paper value chain will shortly publish its updated European Declaration on Paper Recycling where it addresses its commitment to the new targets.

The Circular Economy is one of the core elements necessary to achieving industry transformation in Europe as outlined in our ‘Investment Roadmap’ towards a low-carbon bioeconomy. Check out our alignment matrix for the full picture.

For more information, please contact Ulrich Leberle at u.leberle@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 2 627 49 23
For press related enquiries, please contact Ben Kennard at b.kennard@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 487 39 21 82
 

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10 Mar.2017

The sky’s the limit for the first European “Blue Sky Young Researchers” award

CEPI is today opening the call for applications for the European edition of the “Blue Sky Young Researchers” award for innovation in the pulp and paper industry. Building on the success of the Young Researchers session traditionally held during our annual event European Paper Week this will be the very first time that the renewed award will be granted on a Europe only level.

Eight shortlisted candidates will receive a paid trip to Brussels, Belgium, to present their work before high-level guests and top industry CEOs at CEPI’s annual event and 25th anniversary at European Paper Week in November 2017.

From the shortlist, three successful researchers will be granted the award and invited to present their work at the High Level Session at our annual event. They will also be automatically entered into an international competition where they will be within the chance of winning the global “Global Blue Sky Innovation Award” at a CEO’s roundtable in 2019.
Eligibility criteria

Candidates must:

- Have an idea that could revolutionise the paper industry. The idea is not only about research and development; it is about innovation and about being inspirational, interesting and green.
- Be under 35 years of age
- Currently be working under the supervision of a European research institute or university (regardless of nationality)
- Be fluent in English with good presentation skills
Registration is open now. Applications can be submitted here.
We encourage applicants to apply early. If you are a young researcher this could be your chance to share your work with those who matter and propel your idea to the forefront of the paper industry!

For more information, please contact Bernard de Galembert at b.degalembert@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 2 627 49 27
 

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24 Feb.2017

We have lift-off! European paper industy launches bold investment Roadmap

The European paper industry has today launched the reviewed version of its 2050 Roadmap detailing the pathways and investment needed to cut its carbon emissions by 80% while creating 50% more added-value. The Roadmap projects the need for €44 billion more investment - a 40% increase on current levels - to transform industry in Europe and lead the low-carbon bioeconomy by 2050.

The Confederation of European Paper Industry (CEPI) pioneered in 2011 the first low-carbon industry Roadmap. It is today the first industry to table a blueprint to bolster industry transformation. Today the industry reaffirms its vision that decarbonisation and growth are mutually compatible and calls for a better alignment of policy, research and financing conditions to boost investment in Europe.

“Since our first Roadmap in 2011 the paper industry has invested €15 billion in Europe. More must be done to accelerate industry transformation in Europe over the next decade” say Sylvain Lhôte CEPI’s Director General. “It is now essential to lift-off the low-carbon bioeconomy and pace of transformation”

From energy efficiency to deployment of breakthrough technologies, emissions reduction pathways were estimated to require a combined additional investment of €24 billion by 2050. A further €20 billion of investment would be required to boost the production of new low carbon bio-based products.

“The European Commission has rightly put the focus back on investment” adds Sylvain Lhôte “However; it lacks a long-term commitment to drive manufacturing investments back to Europe. The time to act is now; the policy framework for the next decade is being shaped now and over the next three years”.

For more information, please contact Bernard de Galembert at b.degalembert@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 2 627 49 27
For press related enquiries, please contact Ben Kennard at b.kennard@cepi.org or by phone at (+32 487 39 21 82)

You can download the Roadmap here
 

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