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16 Feb.2017 ,

Joint Declaration for an ambitious EU industrial strategy

The declaration is signed by 125 Associations

Europe is the cradle of the manufacturing industry and has been at the forefront of industrial revolutions and technological innovations. The industry directly employs over 34 million people across all Member States, in supply chains comprising hundreds of thousands of SMEs and larger suppliers. It also indirectly accounts for millions of additional jobs in related sectors.

The European manufacturing industry has tremendous capacity for research and innovation, boasts a skilled workforce and has earned a global reputation for quality and sustainability. What it now needs is the swift and determined support of the European institutions and the Member States to create more jobs and growth in Europe.

The time has come to raise the alarm about the considerable challenges that we are all facing. Between 2000 and 2014, the share of manufacturing in total EU output fell from 18.8% to 15.3%, while 3.5 million manufacturing jobs were lost between 2008 and 2014. Meanwhile, countries around the world are putting industry at the very top of their political agendas. The “Make in India” strategy aims to ensure India is “the next manufacturing destination” and “Made in China 2025” seeks to turn China into the “leading manufacturing power”. The recent US shift towards “America First” will inevitably have a strong impact on their industrial policy.

At the beginning of his mandate, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker identified the reindustrialisation of Europe as one of his top priorities and confirmed the objective of increasing the share of industry in the European GDP to 20% by 2020. As we approach the preparation of the next Multiannual Financial Framework, it is vital for the European Commission to act and help the EU remain a competitive global industrial power playing in a fairer world market.

Therefore we, the European manufacturing industry, representing a diverse range of sectors, call on the European Commission to:

  • reaffirm its commitment to reaching the target of 20% of GDP from industry, with an ambitious and realistic timeline;
  • adopt an Action Plan to tackle the challenges that the industrial sectors are facing, in the framework of a Communication that would include concrete steps and milestones; and
  • commit to implement this Action Plan in a timely manner and regularly report on progress.

Member States and the European Parliament clearly stated their full support for a strong European industrial strategy via the European Council Conclusions calling to strengthen and modernise the EU’s industrial base (15 December 2016) and the Parliament Resolution on the need for a European reindustrialisation policy (5 October 2016).

We, the Signatories of this Joint Declaration, are ready to step up our cooperation with the European Commission, the European Parliament and the Competitiveness Council to define and implement this ambitious and coordinated European industrial strategy that will help safeguard the world leadership of European manufacturers and jobs in Europe.

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15 Feb.2017 ,

ETS: on the right track but pitfalls remain

Following today’s vote at plenary on the Emissions Trading System the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is overall encouraged by the compromise text reached. There is much in the agreement that the industry can be positive about, retaining many of the key components of the compromise text agreed the Environment committee (ENVI) stage.
 

The ETS has moved a step further on its pro-investment track. Although pitfalls still remain at Council level we are confident that the current text can be improved on” says Nicola Rega, Energy and Climate Change Director at CEPI
 

The industry commends several key aspects of the Parliament’s decision:
• Reemphasising the need for all sectors to contribute to reducing carbon emissions
• Encouragement of early movers investing in low-carbon technologies
• Maintaining flexibility in setting the auction share
• A first step in finding solutions to help member states with compensation for indirect carbon costs
• The development of a wider-ranging fund for innovation supporting industry transition towards a low-carbon economy

Unfortunately, the macro-agreement at the core of the decision by the Parliament still maintains traces of discrimination between sectors, ultimately rewarding those investing the least in carbon emission reductions. But we are confident that this environmentally and legally questionable element will be removed as the next stage of the negotiations. This would guarantee that fairness remains a core component of the ETS.


For more information, please contact Nicola Rega at n.rega@cepi.org or by phone at (+32) 485 40 34 12


For press related enquiries, please contact Ben Kennard at b.kennard@cepi.org or by phone at (+32 487 39 21 82)


 

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08 Feb.2017 ,

Preliminary statistics for 2016 published

CEPI has published its preliminary statistics for 2016.

You can find below a summary of the main findings below. Download the publication.

• Paper and board production has decreased by 0.1% in 2016 compared to the previous year. Total production in 2016 was around 91 million tonnes.

• Early estimates indicate that world paper and board production will be up by 0.8% in 2016 to reach 410 million tonnes.

• The production of packaging grades is estimated to have increased by around 2.3% compared to 2015. Within the packaging grades, case materials - mainly used for transport packaging and corrugated boxes - recorded an increase in production of 2.2%

• Sanitary and household manufacturers are estimated to have seen an increase in output of about 1.8% compared to 2015 and accounted for 8.1% of total production.

• Weak printing and publishing activities continue to have an impact on the overall production of graphic grades, which fell by around 3.7%. Output of newsprint - used mainly for daily newspapers - is expected to fall around 6.4%.

• Preliminary indications are that imports of paper and board into Europe have increased by around 6% compared to 2015.

• The overall consumption of paper and board in CEPI countries in 2016 increased by 1% compared to 2015

• It is estimated that the production of pulp (integrated + market) has increased by 0.7% compared to the previous year, with total output of approximately 36.5 million tonnes

• The use of paper for recycling has fallen by around 0.3% when compared to 2015

The finalised version of our statistics (Key Statistics 2016) will be available on our site on July of this year.
 

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07 Feb.2017

Preliminary Statistics 2016

The following statistics are available for free on our website:
- The preliminary statistics, online 2 months after the end of the period reported (e.g.preliminary 2016 statistics are available in February 2017).
- The key statistics, available on our site on July of the following year (e.g. 2016 key stats in July 2017).

Apart from these reports, no statistics are available for free on our website. You can subsribe to receive more statistics.

For more information, please contact: Eric Kilby, Statistics Manager – e.kilby@cepi.org or Ariane Crèvecoeur, Statistics Assistant – a.crevecoeur@cepi.org

Summary:

Paper and board production in CEPI countries shows a small decline from 2015
CEPI member countries paper and board production has decreased by 0.1% in 2016 compared to the previous year, according to preliminary figures. Total production in 2016 was around 91 million tonnes. Machine closures in Europe in 2016 were compensated by new capacities or upgrading of existing ones.

United States and Canadian production are expected to be down by 1.0% and 1.8% respectively. Output slightly increased in South Korea (+0.5%), whilst it was unchanged in Japan and Brazil compared to 2015. The highest growth rates in paper and board output appear to have been recorded by Russia (+3.8%), India (+2.9%) and China (+2.9%).

According to very first estimates, world paper and board production will be up by 0.8% in 2016 to reach 410 million tonnes.

The decline in output of graphic grades persists whilst production of packaging grades continues to rise
The picture by sector maintains the situation witnessed in recent years with a continuation of the decline in the production of graphic grades and further growth in the output of packaging grades.
Weak printing and publishing activities continue to have an impact on the overall production of graphic grades, which fell by around 3.7%. Output of newsprint - used mainly for daily newspapers - is expected to fall around 6.4%. The production of graphic papers for other communication needs - magazines and catalogs, direct mail, directories, etc. - have recorded different developments. The decline in the output of coated mechanical paper and coated woodfree grades reach 7.1% and 5.0% respectively, while uncoated mechanical paper output increased by1.9%. The production of uncoated woodfree grades - mainly office paper - is estimated to have decreased by 1.4%.

The production of packaging grades is estimated to have increased by around 2.3% compared to 2015. Within the packaging grades, case materials - mainly used for transport packaging and corrugated boxes - recorded an increase in production of 2.2%. The output of carton board plus other packaging board - such as small goods packaging or book covers - grew by 2.8%, and the production of wrapping grades - used for paper bags production - showed an increase of around 1.2%. Production is impacted by the ongoing trend towards light-weighting and resource efficiency as it is measured in tonnes. The share of packaging grades accounted for 50.1% (49.0% in 2015) of the total paper and board production, with graphic grades accounting for 37.3% (38.8% in 2015).
Sanitary and household manufacturers are estimated to have seen an increase in output of about 1.8% compared to 2015 and accounted for 8.1% of total production. Output of all other grades of paper and board - mainly for industrial and special purposes - increased by 2.8% (4.5% of total production).

Paper and board deliveries by CEPI countries are expected to be down by 0.7%
Based on the cumulative data up to the end of the third quarter of 2016 it is expected that total paper and board deliveries for the year were down by 0.7% compared to 2015, whilst internal deliveries were stable. By the end of September 2016, deliveries of graphic grades had decreased by 5.6% whilst deliveries of packaging grades rose by 2.9%.
Exports had fallen by 2.9% by the end of September 2016 with the main markets for exports being other European countries, which accounted for about 37% of all exports (36% in the same period of 2015), with deliveries to Asian countries accounting for about 25% (26% in 2015), 12% being exported to North America (11% in 2015), 8% to Latin America and 18% to all other countries.
Preliminary indications are that imports of paper and board into the region have increased by around 6% compared to 2015. Imports from other European countries accounted for 44% of all imports in the first three quarters of 2015 (46% in the same period 2015) and imports from North America had a share of 30% (29% in 2015), with the remaining 26% split between the other regions - Asia 11%, Latin America 6%, and the Rest of the World 9%.


Overall paper and board consumption estimated to increase by 1%
It would appear that the overall consumption of paper and board in CEPI countries in 2016 increased by 1% compared to 2015, based on the latest data available.
The latest macroeconomic projections for the euro area foresee annual real GDP increasing by 1.7% in 2016 and 1.5% in 2017; 1.8% and 1.6% respectively for the EU. Growth in emerging market and developing economies is expected to pick up in 2017.
Weak investment and productivity growth are, however, weighing on medium-term prospects across most of these countries. Downside risks to global growth include increasing policy uncertainty in major advanced economies and some emerging countries, financial market disruptions and weakening potential growth.

Total pulp production increases by 0.7% and market pulp output rises by around 2.5%
It is estimated that the production of pulp (integrated + market) has increased by 0.7% compared to the previous year, with total output of approximately 36.5 million tonnes, and the output of market pulp increased by around 2.5%.

Utilisation of paper for recycling falls by around 0.3% when compared to 2015
It is estimated that utilisation of paper for recycling by CEPI members, at 47.6 million tonnes, decreased by around 0.3% compared to 2015.

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31 Jan.2017 ,

Energy-intensive sectors call on MEPs to reject any "tiered approach"

We, the signatories of this paper, energy-intensive sectors representing about 2 million jobs in the EU and comprising many SME’s, are under direct impact of the EU ETS and are recognized as exposed to carbon, investment and employment leakage.


We ask Members of the European Parliament to acknowledge the mutual importance of our sectors for the EU economy, in particular for European jobs in your constituencies, and all our economic value chains by fully rejecting any “tiered approach” to free allocation and voting against it.


In order to ensure an equal level playing field for all energy-intensive industries, we call for the rejection of all approaches which aim at discriminating a few from other sectors exposed to carbon leakage risks, namely: the “tiered approach” to free allowance allocation, the “tiered CSCF” and the “import inclusion mechanism”.


This discrimination between industrial sectors goes against the principle set in the October European Council Conclusions that best performing companies in ETS carbon leakage sectors should not bear further carbon costs. Indeed, it would ensure that even best performers in most sectors would bear significant carbon costs.


We appreciate that all policy makers want to avoid undue carbon costs to industry and the triggering of the cross-sectoral correction factor (CSCF, reduces benchmark-based allocation to undertakings). The fairest and most effective way to provide eligible companies with the allowances needed for controlling the carbon leakage risk and still avoiding the CSCF is to increase the free allocation share and to reduce the auctioning volume accordingly. However, we are concerned by the ENVI proposal to exclude only certain sectors from the application of the CSCF, via the so-called “tiered CSCF”. Other sectors in turn would be severely undersupplied. Again this approach would arbitrarily differentiate between different European industries. Protection of some sectors should not be achieved at the expense of the others. Such segregation would also bring into question the environmental integrity of the scheme.


Moreover, we are alarmed by the late introduction of an entirely new proposal for an “import inclusion mechanism” for sectors with lower trade intensity. This is discriminatory, legally questionable and would limit the ability of certain sectors to compete on a level playing field. The notion is contrary to the principal idea of the carbon leakage risk assessment being based on two main criteria (trade intensity and CO2 intensity) as the “import inclusion mechanism” only considers the former. Finally, it goes against the Paris Agreement which does not contain any suggestions allowing for unilateral trade measures. Overall, it introduces a major change to the future of the ETS scheme increasing the legal uncertainty for the ETS reform post 2020.


We reiterate our opposition to any differentiation between the energy intensive industries and under any form of the “tiered approach” and ask you to reject it in the Plenary.

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