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11 Oct.2018 ,

EU’s new circular bioeconomy strategy - European forest fibre and paper industry ready to lead

CEPI, the European association representing the forest fibre and paper industry, applauded today’s release of a more tangible Bioeconomy Strategy laying the conditions for creating a truly circular, low-carbon bioeconomy in Europe.

The EU’s new Bioeconomy Strategy rightly puts the emphasis on bridging the bioeconomy, sustainability and circularity. It also goes beyond research to deploy bioeconomy innovation and investments in Europe,” says Sylvain Lhôte, Director General of CEPI, the European forest fibre and paper industry “being a mainstream renewable and recyclable material industry, we have the means to put this strategy into action.”

The industry has set out a transformational strategy in a first of its kind low-carbon bioeconomy Roadmap, which aims at advancing industry’s full potential of the bioeconomy, circularity and innovation. This vision for the industry triggered around 5.5 billion EUR of investment in Europe in 2017. The industry is committed to leveraging the new EU Bioeconomy Strategy to accelerate the pace of transformation and investment in Europe.

What works in the Strategy?

The new EU Strategy also has a clear focus on reducing Europe’s dependence on fossil resources and promoting sustainably sourced bio-based products. The 10bn euro earmarked for a new food and natural resources cluster in the Horizon Europe R&D programme will encourage industry’s bioeconomy research and investments. The new “circular bioeconomy investment platform” to de-risk funding for private investments will also be key in boosting investments and deploying novel biorefineries in our industry.

Note to editor:

CEPI is the European association representing the forest fibre and paper industry and supports more than 1.5 million jobs in the forest-fibre and paper value chain (almost 10% of the bioeconomy-related jobs in the EU). Building on its renewable and recyclable roots, the industry sources more than 92% of the pulp it uses from the EU, while more than 72% of the paper it produces is recycled.

Discussing how to better bridge the bioeconomy and circularity will be at the forefront of the debate taking place next week, 16-17 October at Paper & Beyond, a new event concept that unites bioeconomy and circularity leaders from across the globe in Brussels. Learn more on how the European forest fibre and paper industry is leading the debate on a low-carbon circular bioeconomy in Europe at www.paperandbeyond.com.

 

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28 Sep.2018

Sustainability goes ‘live’ as CEPI unveils new sustainability platform

 CEPI, the European association representing the pulp and paper industry, today unveils a dynamic ‘live’ sustainability platform which demonstrates, amongst other things, industry’s sustainability achievements.

“We are delighted to offer our members and the European industry at large a one-stop shop for all industry sustainability data and achievements” says Jori Ringman, Deputy Director General of CEPI. “The platform will be systematically updated once the new data becomes available; meaning our sustainability platform is always ‘live’ and up to date when you need it”.

The concept behind the platform

The new platform departs from the past practice of producing a new, ‘static’ sustainability report biannually. Building on CEPI’s more than twenty year history of being the focal point for third-party verified, industry data, all information on the site will be updated systematically multiple times per year. Users will be able to download the entire website as a PDF or pick and choose per policy section.

Pulp and paper company good practices, all in one place

The new platform also offers the possibility for companies across CEPI’s membership to display their good practices in the fields of bioeconomy, circular economy/recycling, environment, energy and climate change and forestry. The dedicated Good Practices section will be the focal point for researchers, journalists, policymakers and more seeking best examples from the sustainability leaders in our industry.

Key data for 2017 revealed

Following on from the publication of CEPI’s ‘Key Statistics’ in July, the new platform also reveals a wealth of data on industry’s sustainability achievements. Notably, new certification figures were made public showing that 83.2% of the pulp purchased by the industry is certified and that 70.7% of wood, woodchips or residues from saw mills purchased by the industry comes from certified forests.
Note to editor:

For press-related enquiries, please contact Ben Alexander Kennard, CEPI’s Communications Manager, at b.kennard@cepi.org
For general enquiries, please contact Jori Ringman, CEPI’s Deputy Director General, at j.ringman@cepi.org

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21 May.2018 ,

Understanding materiality - significant impacts in the sector

CEPI has worked with Deloitte to identify the sector’s significant impacts: what is material in pulp and paper industry. The assessment of the sector on the European level produced detailed matrices and Key Performance Indicators for the identified five most material issues.

One size doesn’t fit all: It is understood that each individual organization will have its own ranking of material topics – depending on its core business, its key markets, countries of operation and other specifics of the organisation.

Ultimately, one of the objectives of this process is to support CEPI’s members can run their own materiality analysis, starting with the industry-wide view presented here – and customizing it further to their own organisation. This is supported by a separate document, the ‘How to’ toolkit.

 

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19 Dec.2016 ,

Letter to the European Commission President Juncker and First Vice-President Timmermans: Concerns on the potential discontinuation of EU Ecolabel product groups

We, European paper manufacturers, retailers and wholesalers, consumer organisations and environmental NGOs, are writing to share our concerns about the possible removal of a number of EU Ecolabel product groups[1] which we understand the Commission is considering. In our view, such a unilateral and unexpected consideration would be premature, given the ongoing Fitness Check of the EU Ecolabel Regulation, and we urge the Commission to reconsider the possible discontinuation of these product groups.

The Commission has recognised the EU Ecolabel as an “incentive scheme in favour of the market” which can benefit consumers and boost job creation[2]. This voluntary, market-based instrument is also consistent with, and complementary to, other EU policies concerning the circular economy and sustainable development[3].

The Commission has suggested discontinuing some product groups that include two relatively successful EU Ecolabel paper-related products (tissue and newsprint). Such a discontinuation would have the following consequences:

1. Environmental benefits would be reduced: Narrowing the scope and the uptake of the scheme will reduce its positive effects as a sign-post for product sustainability in areas ranging from biodiversity to water and energy efficiency or chemicals and raw materials management.

2. A proliferation of labels could lead to additional confusion among consumers: The Ecolabel is designed to help EU citizens make sustainable purchases, with a range of almost 40,000 environmentally more friendly products and services, of which one quarter are paper-related. Consumers already face a wide variety of labels, and a credible EU Ecolabel allows them to buy with more confidence. Having no EU Ecolabel for paper may result in a further proliferation of private or national schemes. Such schemes are likely to use slightly differing criteria and contain protectionist national features, hampering the functioning of the EU single market.

3. Business would face significant costs: Both the tissue and newsprint EU Ecolabels have generated several billions of euros in sales every year. Companies have invested significantly to be able to use the EU Ecolabel on their products which has helped companies market these products across the EU and access green public procurement with fewer administrative burdens. Such market uptake takes time and perseverance. Dropping these labels would lead to extra costs for such companies, as for example existing packaging materials of EU Ecolabelled products would need to be modified, and would create market uncertainty.

The Commission’s suggestion to prematurely remove specific product groups in isolation raises questions not only over the evidence used, but also on the process, governance and stakeholder consultation as set under the EU Ecolabel Regulation. This also seems to us incompatible with the Commission’s Better Regulation guidelines issued last year.
We therefore urge the Commission to:

- Reconsider any suggested discontinuation of specific product groups at this point in time;

- Underpin with clear evidence, such as produced by the Fitness check, any decision on the fate of the ecolabels for specific product groups and the future of the scheme;

- Make the consultation process transparent, involving the EU Ecolabelling Board and stakeholders from manufacturing, retail and consumer organisations.

We remain at your disposal for any questions you might have and to further discuss any issues related to the future of the EU Ecolabel.

Yours sincerely,

Sylvain Lhôte, Director General Confederation of European Paper Industries

Roberto Berardi, Chairman, European Tissue Symposium 

Monique Goyens, Director General, The European Consumer Organisation

Jeremy Wates, Secretary General, European Environmental Bureau

Christian Verschueren, Director General, Eurocommerce

Note to editor:


For more information please contact:


CEPI: Jori Ringman, Sustainability Director by e-mail at j.ringman@cepi.org or by phone at


ETS: Phil Mogel, Relation Manager, at info@europeantissue.com


BEUC & EEB: Blanca Morales, EU Ecolabel Coordinator at Blanca.Morales@beuc.eu


Eurocommerce: Lettemieke Mulder, Director Sustainability & Product Policy at mulder@eurocommerce.eu

 




 

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08 May.2015

2015 ICFPA Sustainability Progress Report

The International Council of Forest and Paper Associations (ICFPA) has launched its 2015 Sustainability Progress Report, showing improvements on a range of sustainability indicators and focusing on the industry’s contributions toward a green economy.

The full report is also available on the ICFPA website at http://www.icfpa.org/uploads/Modules/Publications/2015-icfpa-sustainability-progress-report.pdf.

Read the press release on the topic here.

The global sustainability performance of the forest product industry is improving, with all aggregate indicators for reporting associations showing progress:

• Greenhouse gas emissions intensity was reduced by 17% between 2005 and 2013.
• The share of bio-energy in the industry’s fuel mix increased by 8 percentage points, to 61%, since 2005.
• The number of hectares certified to a third-party sustainable forest management certification system increased by 41 percentage points, to 52% of wood supply, since 2000.
• The global paper recycling rate increased by 11 percentage points, to 58%, between 2001 and 2013.
• Onsite energy intensity was reduced by 4.3% between 2005 and 2013.
• Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions decreased by 40% between 2005 and 2013.
• Employees’ recordable incident rate decreased by 9% between 2007 and 2013.

In addition to reporting on performance, the Sustainability Progress Report illustrates how the forest and paper industry is supporting a green economy through resource efficiency, carbon sequestration, innovative technologies, bio-based products, and benefiting communities.  Contributing to the 2015 report are forest and paper industry associations from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Europe, Japan, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States.

For more information about the sustainability of the global forest and paper industry, visit icfpa.org.
 

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