Recycling

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recycling
28 Nov.2014

CEPI welcomes Commission intentions for meaningful recycling in Europe and identifies enabling measures for meeting ambitious targets

UPDATE: The Commission has recently announced the withdrawal of the waste targets review and will publish a new proposal in the course of 2015.

Comments by CEPI on the European Commission proposal for a DIRECTIVE OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL amending Directives 2008/98/EC on waste, 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste, 1999/31/EC on the landfill of waste, 2000/53/EC on end-of-life vehicles, 2006/66/EC on batteries and accumulators and waste batteries and accumulators, and 2012/19/EU on waste electrical and electronic equipment /* COM/2014/0397 final - 2014/0201 (COD)

Summary

• Recycling Targets must be ambitious but realistic to increase collection in an environment where some Member States have already reached high recycling rates. Member States should set their target for paper packaging recycling at a minimum of 80% by 2020.
• Packaging Recycling targets in Europe should not discriminate between the different consumer packaging materials
• The proposed methodology to calculate recycling rates can favour high quality recycling but it should refer to material specific standards or similar quality assurances. For paper, the input method should continue to apply under strict input quality criteria, including for exports
• Incineration restrictions and separate paper collection obligations are needed as complementary measures to ensure recyclable paper diverted from landfills gets actually recycled.
• Final recycling must be clearly defined to ensure targets are meaningful and can be compared between Member States.

Recycling Targets: Minimum targets for Paper Packaging Recycling Rates should be set at 80% by 2020 in all Member States


European Paper Industry is a world champion in recycling, but reaching new targets will be increasingly challenging as several Member States have already reached recycling rates close to the theoretical potential of paper recycling. The average European Paper Recycling rate was 71,7% in 2013 and the sector has set a target of 70% recycling rate by 2015. The recycling rate has increased significantly from levels around 40% in 1990 and 62% in 2005, but has started levelling up since the last five years. As we reach the absolute potentials of paper recycling in some Member States, setting ambitious targets in all Member States is crucial to further stipulate recycling in less than average performing countries. Too ambitious average targets alone will however not be sufficient to reach the objectives set out in the circular economy communication. Further improvement of the paper and board packaging recycling rate will largely depend on progress in less than average performing countries. CEPI therefore proposes that all Member States set their target for paper packaging recycling at a minimum of 80% by 2020. Concrete targets for 2025 and 2030 should be set once the performance based on the proposed methodology and progress towards 2020 targets is assessed, e.g. through the newly proposed early warning system.
Recycling targets in Europe should not discriminate between consumer packaging materials and one material should not compensate for others in a Member State’s calculation of all packaging waste prepared for re-use and recycled. Recyclability and the recycling performance have increasingly become key aspects in the competition between consumer packaging materials.


Calculation Methodology : for paper, the input method should continue to apply under strict input quality criteria
CEPI welcomes the Commission’s intention to set the focus on high quality recycling. The recycling process can only deliver efficiently produced high quality recycled products if the input to this final recycling process fulfills strict quality requirements, too. The Commission proposal rightly distinguishes between final recycling processes with « clean » input material, for which the input method would continue to be applied, and final recycling processes with lesser quality material, for which the output method would have to be applied. CEPI understands the proposed discarded materials as non-target material that is not part of the original product and can be separated in dry sorting.
In the production of recycled paper, the input material for the recycling process is covered by a European Standard (EN 643). This standard sets limits on the share of non-paper components generally not exceeding 1,5%. CEPI is therefore of the opinion that for paper, the input method should continue to apply. However, the Commission proposal leaves too much room for interpretation and should refer to European Standards or similar quality assurances.
Paper for Recycling exported outside the European Union should count towards the recycling rate provided it meets the EN 643 standard and is effectively recycled outside Europe at broadly equivalent environmental conditions as in the EU. This should be demonstrated by a certification scheme as it is being considered by the European Commission and which would include in its scope the reprocessing site in the destination country and ensure traceability through adequate documentation.
Furthermore, it is of great importance that the denominator for the calculation of the recycling rates is identical in all Member States to allow for comparison.

Complementary measures to reach recycling targets
To reach high recycling targets based on the proposed new methodology, complementary measures next to the introduction of a landfill ban are however essential:


Incineration restrictions
CEPI welcomes the introduction of a landfill ban for recyclable waste. However, CEPI thinks that formulating a landfill ban for recyclable material and high recycling targets is not sufficient to reach the objectives. CEPI therefore thinks it is needed to formulate incineration restrictions for recyclable material from the municipal waste stream. This is to avoid waste is only shifted one step up in the waste hierarchy. In the past, several Member States have set the focus on diversion from landfill. This has partly led to low quality collection systems, which would not be able to deliver the input quality to recycling processes according to the new methodology as suggested bythe Commission proposal.

Obligation to collect paper separately from other recyclables and residual waste
To ensure reaching the required quality input for paper recycling processes, paper should be collected separately from other recyclables such as plastics, metal and glass, and from residual waste. The Waste Directive of 2008 has formulated a separate collection target in 2008, however Member States have interpreted this requirement in different ways. CEPI therefore urges the Commission to reinforce the requirement on separate collection for paper. Separate collection is crucial to achieve the landfill restrictions proposed by the commission.


Current recycling definition is too vague
The current definition of recycling is too vague, as it includes next to “reprocessing” also “any other recovery operations”. This leads to a wide range of interpretations, including on the recycling rate, between countries and materials. The only way to ensure material that has been discarded is effectively back in the circular economy is to make sure it is not recognized recycled unless it is reprocessed in a production process into new products, materials or substances that have comparable properties to the corresponding virgin raw materials. The proposed methodology for high quality recycling cannot be reached without a precise recycling definition. Article 3 (17) of directive 2008/98/EC should be amended as follows :


• ‘recycling’ means any recovery operation by which waste materials are reprocessed into products, materials or substances whether for the original or other purposes. It includes the reprocessing of organic material but does not include energy recovery and the reprocessing into materials that are to be used as fuels or for backfilling operations; ‘final recycling’ means reprocessing in a production process of waste or materials reclaimed from waste into products, materials or substances with similar properties as the equivalent virgin raw material based product, material or substance. It excludes pre-processing.


Next to these measures, CEPI has the following comments on the Commission proposal:
Extended Producer Responsibility : CEPI believes that the proposed provisions of Annex VII paragraph 6.1 and 6.4 place disproportionate financial burden on producers and cover aspects beyond the producers’ control. Putting the burden of « financial contributions to cover the entire cost of waste management… » would act as a disincentive for other actors with roles and responsibilities in the waste collection and sorting chain to focus on cost efficiency. Consequently the competitiveness of European economy would be harmed. CEPI believes that extended producer responsibility should not allow overlapping and duplicating payments: fees should only apply in absence of action when responsibility is delegated to compliance schemes, and fees should be charged on the basis of true cost after the deduction of all fees and revenues related to the waste generated. CEPI also believes Annex VII concerning minimum requirements for EPR should not be amended through the adoption of delegated acts since they are an essential part of the legislation.
Renewability : CEPI is concerned that the Commission published a proposal on the circular economy without mentioning renewability. CEPI believes that the contribution of renewable materials and products to the circular economy should be acknowledged, e.g. by adding renewability to the packaging eco-design options for Member States consideration. CEPI believes that such a non-binding list of ecodesign options is preferred over national packaging design requirements as proposed by the Commission as the latter would undermine the single market by producing barriers to trade.
Definition of Municipal Waste : The definition of municipal waste should not include material from the retail sector. The collection of waste from the retail sector is already well organised. Including the retail sector would divert the focus from the challenge of improving the waste collection from households and small shops.


For more information, please contact Ulrich Leberle at u.leberle@cepi.org, mobile +32 479 905 921

 

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28 Nov.2014

Best practice specifications for tendering the collection of Paper for Recycling

The new EU directives on public procurement and concessions entered into force in April 2014. Public contracts that are covered by the European directives are valued at around €420 billion, making them a key driver of our economy.


The new rules are interesting for businesses, with the award criteria emphasising quality, environmental considerations, social aspects and innovation. They make it easier for small and medium-sized firms to bid and include tougher rules on subcontracting.


The adoption of the new directives on public procurement and concessions constitutes a large shift in procurement, as the new rules might open up new opportunities in the Single market. It is now up to all the users, including businesses, to take advantage of the new rules.


For paper recycling in particular, the change of the legal framework could help form a new tendering culture for waste collection in the member states. More specifically, the possibility to introduce criteria of the most economically-advantageous tender instead of the best price improves the functioning of the internal market. This new process gives the tendering authority the possibility to negotiate and incorporate elements that would otherwise be overlooked.


This Best Practice publication, as well as the free calculation tool for collection target benchmarking are examples of how national or regional competent authorities can all ensure that the new rules are put in practice and start contributing to a more transparent, efficient and professional public procurement. These elements are all vital in relaunching growth in the Single Market.

The brochure also exists in Italian.  Donwload it here

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04 Jul.2014

Joint press release: Adoption of the EU Circular Economy Package highlights the need to shift focus from waste to resource management

On the occasion of the adoption of the EU Circular Economy Package (“Towards a circular economy: A zero waste programme for Europe”) by the European Commission, four EU recycling industries are committing to work together and pursue the common goal of promoting circular economy.


The four recycling industries include the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI), the EU Non-ferrous Metals Industry Association (Eurometaux), Plastics Recyclers Europe (PRE) and the Groupement Européen de l'Industrie de la Régénération (GEIR). The four industries welcome a number of proposals included in the package such as: the progressive landfill ban on recyclable waste, better reporting of data, new requirements on waste exports to fight against illegal shipments of waste, the link between innovation and ambitious recycling targets.


While the Package is a right step forward in promoting recycling, the four recycling industries believe that a number of elements included in the package require further clarification:


- The proposed definition of recycling is too broad; it can create confusion with collection, sorting or pre-processing, while it should be clearly defined to favour high quality processing/recovery of materials so as to contribute to resource efficiency and a sustainable access to valuable materials. The absence of a robust recycling definition can lead to recycling targets miscalculation. The proposed change in the methodology to calculate recycling rates should serve ambitious targets but also consider industrial reality.


- The reference to high quality recycling, while very valuable, focuses too much on quantity and not enough supporting higher quality collection, sorting and recycling of the various types of materials. A more product centric approach to recycling which considers the entity of raw materials in specific product groups is recommended.


- End of waste status: the concept of quality treatment and recycling should be applied here too. If waste reaching end-of-waste status is simply exported outside the EU with no guarantee of quality treatment, the status will not contribute to the EU circular economy.


- Ambitious collection and recycling targets can be an important driver for increasing recycling levels. As an example, for waste oils, EU-wide recycling and collection targets should be introduced. Re-refining waste oils to base oils contributes to the EU circular economy and is a technically feasible way to manage this hazardous waste stream.


Note to the editor:
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit making organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing this industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Its mission is to promote the members’ business sector by taking specific actions notably, by monitoring and analysing activities and initiatives in the areas of industry, environment, energy, forestry, recycling, fiscal policies and competitiveness in general. Through CEPI, the paper industry increases its visibility and acts on emerging issues, making expert and constructive contributions on behalf of the industry.
Website: www.cepi.org


Eurometaux is the Brussels-based EU association of the non-ferrous metals industry, representing the main EU and international metals producers, EU and international metal commodity groups and national metal federations. The industry covers base metals (Al, Cu, Pb, Ni, Zn, Sn), precious metals (Au, Ag, PGM´s) and technical metals (e.g. Co, W, Cr, Mo, Mn), manufactured from both virgin and recycled raw materials.
Website: www.eurometaux.be


Plastics Recyclers Europe (PRE) promotes plastics recycling and creates conditions that enable profitable & sustainable business while offering a service platform to its members. Currently Plastics Recyclers Europe has more than 115 members from all over the EU which are recycling more than 2.5 million tones of plastics waste.
Website: www.plasticsrecyclers.eu


GEIR (Groupement Européen de l'Industrie de la Régénération) is the European Re-refining Industry association. Used lubricating oils represent the largest amount of liquid, non-aqueous hazardous waste in the world. Today the European waste oil recycling industry is comprised of 28 plants and employs between 1000-1200 in re-refining and 2000-2500 people in the collection of waste oil. Seventeen of the plants produce base oils. The industry has a total nameplate capacity of 1.300.000 tonnes/year, total lube oil production of 400.000t/y and produces 500.000 t/y of other products including fuels, asphalt, gasoil, flux oil etc. It has an approximate total turnover of between € 200-250 million/year.
Website: www.geir-rerefining.org

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02 Jul.2014

Landfill ban for recyclables is a step forward…

…but the Circular Economy Package misses six essential points

Today the European Commission adopted the EU Circular Economy Package (“Towards a circular economy: A zero waste programme for Europe). The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) welcomes the inclusion of landfill bans for recyclables by the Commission, but regrets that the package omits six essential points including incineration restrictions.

1. Still no restriction on incineration of recyclable paper
CEPI welcomes the fact that the Circular Economy Package includes landfill restrictions for recyclables as of 2025, but regrets that incineration for the same materials is not restricted. Despite the existing capacity for reprocessing paper in Europe up to 10 million tonnes of paper is currently being landfilled or incinerated in Europe.

2. Targets based on robust data and robust methods
CEPI is concerned about the way the Commission sets new recycling targets and a new calculation method without having tested them on current recycling performances first. Recycling targets in Europe should not discriminate between competing materials and the level of ambition for recycling targets needs to be set realistically.

“The new recycling targets are based on the best performing EU member states although recycling rates from these states are not comparable. Current calculation methods for recycling vary between countries.” explains Jori Ringman, CEPI Recycling, Product and Environment Director.

3. Collection targets
The paper industry calls for EU-wide minimum collection targets for recyclable materials to support high recycling and re-use targets in Europe. As EU legislation already obliges EU member states to collect at least paper, metal, plastic and glass separately by 2015, collection targets would provide an incentive to fulfil this requirement and secure a constant supply of raw materials for the European economy.

4. Recycling based on proximity
The Circular Economy Package should include a proximity principle to ensure that recycling will take place as close as possible to the consumption and collection points in Europe. This will enhance the circular economy by guaranteeing a faster recycling cycle and delivering more value with less input.

5. Recycling ‘Made in Europe’
To advance the circular economy, the definition of recycling in Europe needs to be revised. At the moment, the definition is vague and does not support good quality data collection nor reprocessing of materials.

6. A stronger focus on renewability
In nature, circularity equals renewability. The European paper industry regrets that the Commission does not acknowledge renewability of materials as a solution for the circular economy.

As the European paper industry is based on renewable raw materials and accomplished a world record paper recycling rate of almost 72% in 2013, it is at the core of the circular economy.

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For more information, please contact CEPI Recycling, Product and Environment Director Jori Ringman at (j.ringman-beck@cepi.org), mobile: +32 478 255 070


Note

European Commission Circular economy package: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/circular-economy/index_en.htm

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 515 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 780 paper mills. Together they represent 23% of world production.

 


 

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30 Jun.2014

Improving paper recycling in Poland – preparing for the circular economy

Organisations involved in paper recycling discuss European best practices

Experts on paper recycling met on 24 June in the Palace of Culture and Science in Warsaw. The conference focused on European best practices aimed at improving local selective collection and paper recycling performances.


More than 80 top paper recycling professionals followed the invitation from the IMPACT project group to attend the Conference entitled ‘Circular Economy – How to improve paper collection in Poland?’ on 24 June in Warsaw, Poland. The conference was followed by a visit to the newly opened Stora Enso Ostroleka mill the next day, to show paper making hands on.


SPP - the Association of Polish Papermakers was represented by their Director General Mr Zbigniew Fornalski. He expressed the hope that “this conference will kick-off a more permanent dialogue between all Polish municipalities, waste management companies and paper makers to make the best use of our available raw materials and properly prepare Poland for the circular economy”.


Jolanta Krzywiec, Director of Municipal Waste Management in the Department of Warsaw, introduced the new waste management system in Warsaw. “The municipality in Warsaw is doing their utmost to improve paper collection and ensuring a constant high quality level of this valuable raw material for the paper industry“, stressed Mrs Krzywiec. Mr Krzysztof Kawczyński - Chairman for the Committee for the Protection of the Environment in the National Chamber of Commerce introduced the new waste recycling regulation in Poland.


Several best practice cases from countries around Europe gave valuable examples to local municipalities in Poland on how to step up paper collection and recycling quality in the country. Especially the example from Aspapel – the Spanish paper industry association – showed how in a short period of time educational campaigns on paper recycling can be a very effective tool to improve recycling rates in a country.


“Paper needs to be collected separately from other waste streams to maintain a consistent quality and achieve high recycling targets and bring the current Polish recycling rate to the EU average“, explains Ulrich Leberle from the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI).
The workshop was the kick-off of the IMPACT committment -of which CEPI is a member- aiming to achieve the European Innovation Partnernship's objectives. IMPACT partners hope to organise similar events in other countries aiming to improve their paper recycling rates in the future. CEPI is also part of a European Recovered Paper Council that has pledged to improve paper recycling in Europe.


The conference was a satellite meeting as part of a larger European Commission event on resource efficiency and the circular economy - the Greenweek. Greenweek takes place every year in Brussels and attracts thousands of participants from all over Europe with an interest in the environment.

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For more information, please contact Daniela Haiduc at d.haiduc@cepi.org, mobile: +32 (0) 473562936 or Katarzyna Godlewska sp@spp.pl or Agnieszka Radziłowska ARadzilowska@um.warszawa.pl


Note to the Editor

IMPACT - Introduction and Improvement of Separate Paper Collection to avoid landfilling and incineration
The partners of IMPACT will offer municipalities best practices and advice in the separate collection of paper from the municipal waste stream (mainly households and small shops) to support them in phasing out landfilling and incineration. Targeted municipalities are in regions with paper recycling rates below 60%, particularly Poland (38.5%) and Romania (53.5%), as well as areas where commingled collection is pre-dominant such as in France and in the United Kingdom. In the second half, the project will be extended to other countries with low collection rates or predominance of comingled collection. The diversion of recyclable paper from landfilling will help local authorities meet the targets of the EU landfill directive. EU Member States highly depending on landfill have to respect a target to reduce the share of biodegradable waste going to landfill to 35% by 2020.
Webpage: www.cepi.org/impact

Greenweek
The 2014 edition of Green Week, the biggest annual conference on European environment policy it takes place in Brussels under the theme Circular Economy, Resource Efficiency & Waste. Satellite events are taking place all around in May/June 2014 at local or regional level.
All information at http://www.greenweek2014.eu/index.html
The Association of Polish Papermakers (SPP)
The Association of Polish Papermakers is an organization of scientific, technical and managerial qualities with individual and corporate members whose activities are connected with the paper and paper converting industries. an organization of scientific, technical and managerial qualities with individual and corporate members whose activities are connected with the paper and paper converting industries. The association members represent near 80% of polish paper production and significant part of corrugated board market.
The purposes of SPP activity are:
• to integrate papermakers, preserve association tradition and document papermaking history and also create professional ethics among the members, amicable solidarity and mutual remembrance,
• to represent papermakers on the forum of the governmental and local administration organs,
• to create conditions for versatile exchange of information and options on current and future needs of the paper industry and related branches, particularly concerning production quality and quantity, new products, raw materials and intermediates, machine and equipment performance, control and automation of manufacturing processes, power engineering, environmental protection, paper trade, economic, organizational and marketing issues and personnel training.
More information available at http://www.spp.pl

Warsaw municipality
Warsaw, the capital of Poland Warsaw is a major international tourist destination and an important economic hub in Central Europe. Warsaw is a green city. Since 2006, Warsaw has been hosting Recycling Days – a picnic event, during which unwanted materials, such as electronic junk, etc. is collected. In exchange for plastic bottles and used batteries one can obtain geranium seedlings, herbs or garden conifers.
Today Warsaw is revolutionizing its system of segregation, collection, treatment and recycling of waste. The new rules will mean less waste going to landfill, with far more resources being recovered and used again. The new sorting system is accompanied by a broad campaign to inform and educate the public. Warsaw is organising a multitude of environmental initiatives, as the names of selected projects prove: Festival of Trees, Earth Hour, Climate Day Picnic and Car-Free Day. In November 2013 Warsaw hosted the UN Conference on Climate Change. Organization of this summit in Poland’s capital means that Poland is holding the Presidency of the climate convention from November 2013 to November 2014. Warsaw is the only city in Poland and after Berlin, the second in Central Europe to cooperate under the C40 Large Cities Leadership Group towards Climate Change. Cooperation also takes place within the Clinton Climate Initiative organization and the Eurocities association. These activities result in the implementation of specific programs - thermo-modernization of public buildings, energy efficient street lighting, and the launching of environmentally friendly practices with regard to water, wastewater and waste management. Warsaw’s Mayor Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz is the president of Eurocities – a network for cooperation between Europe’s metropolises.

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 520 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 950 paper mills. Together they represent 23% of world production.
Paper recycling: www.paperforrecycling.eu
Resource efficiency: www.cepi.org/resourceefficiency
Website: http://www.cepi.org/ mail@cepi.org Connect with us: @EuropeanPaper

 

 

 

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