Recycling

Recycling
Press Release | 26 Jan.2017

A year into the project, IMPACTPapeRec consolidates efforts to increase separate paper collection in Europe

The successful Horizon 2020 IMPACTPapeRec Project Conference united more than 50 professionals from across Europe and debated the ways to increase separate paper collection in the EU, a key element in Europe’s transition towards a Circular Economy. The event took place in Barcelona (Spain) on 24 January. 


IMPACTPapeRec brings together the whole paper value chain for the first time in a joint project with the two-fold goal of promoting separate collection of “Paper for Recycling” and avoiding landfilling and incineration, particularly in countries with a low recycling rate. The event constitutes a step further in that direction.


In the past year, project partners exchanged views with paper collection decision-makers from seven municipalities ranging from the U.K to Romania, Poland, Bulgaria and France and mapped out the current waste management systems in Europe.


The mapping, presented at the conference, revealed major differences in challenges between countries with a well-established recycling system and those where such a system is still being implemented. In addition, citizen awareness and motivation was a recurring topic throughout the event.


In order to enhance the discussion, key experts spoke about the importance of quality of Paper for Recycling, efficiency of payment systems and incentives to encourage recycling, as well as the sensitive issue of informal paper collection outside officially-established waste management systems.


In addition, the partners presented some of the identified best practices, which will undergo a deeper analysis throughout the months to come. Participants also participated in a world-café format informative meeting, sharing their views on critical issues such as standardisation and policymaking developments.
Paper collection is a multi-dimensional issue and finding a stand-alone solution is not possible”, said Antonio Dobón, project coordinator from ITENE. “We are confident that the project will help us find the right ways to promote paper collection wherever we can”.


The project will come to an end in January 2018 with a final conference organised in Brussels. Until then, the 19 partners will continue to work towards achieving the project’s objectives. A number of the best practices identified will be selected, leading to the publication of an informational web-based “handbook“, a practical guide to help municipalities achieve better collection rates.


You can find further information and photos from the event at www.impactpaperec.eu
 

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Press Release | 18 Jan.2017

IMPACTPapeRec Project Conference

• The European project IMPACTPapeRec will bring together about 70 professionals on 24 January in Barcelona (Spain), to focus on the challenges and opportunities for increasing separate collection of paper in EU countries.

• Experts from STORAENSO, CEPI, ASPAPEL, SPRINGLOOP COOPERATIE, INTECUS, ACR+, DIN, PROPAKMA, PTS and ITENE will analysebest practices across Europe, optimum quality of Paper for Recycling, payment systems’ efficiency depending on the quantity of residues produced and incentives to recycling, as well as the issue of non-legally-established paper collection waste management systems.

• The Packaging, Transport and Logistics Research Center (ITENE) organises the event as the coordinator of the IMPACTPapeRec project. The project is supported by the EU Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Program and consists of a consortium of 19 partners from 8 European countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Poland, Romania and Spain.

Consumption of paper and board in the EU stands at 82 million tonnes, 58 million of which are recycled to make new paper and board products. 47 million tones are recycled in Europe and 11 in other countries, meaning a paper recycling rate of 71.7% in Europe, according to the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI).
ITENE, IMPACTPapeRec coordinator, organises the first “Project Conference and Networking Informative Meeting” with the objective of further increasing the separate collection of paper for recycling and promoting appropriate schemes to avoid landfilling and incineration.


The event will be held on 24 January in Barcelona and it will bring together more than 70 professionals to attend experts’ presentations from STORAENSO, CEPI, ASPAPEL, SPRINGLOOP COOPERATIE, INTECUS, ACR +, DIN, PROPAKMA, PTS and ITENE.


First, participants will learn about the current state of selective collection of Paper for Recycling in Europe, including the main challenges and opportunities identified in different EU countries as well as best practices already in place. The optimal quality of Paper for Recycling and collection will also be discussed, as well as experts’ opinions on incentives for recycling and pay-as-you-through systems efficacy, plus the issue of informal paper collection that is not part of the legally established systems. 

After the Conference, during the Networking Informative Meeting attendees will be asked to share their ideas and opinions on good practices, incentives, policy making and standardisation actions needed to increase the selective collection of Paper for Recycling and its quality in Europe.
The audience will include stakeholders involved in recycling and sustainability issues working in the paper industry, municipalities across the EU, waste management companies, policy makers, standardization odies and citizen associations.


Attendance to the Conference and Networking Meeting is free of charge. You can find further information and registration details at www.impactpaperec.eu

Note to editor

 The IMPACTPapeRec project is financed by the European Union Horizon 2020 Programme and supports the separate collection of paper commitment of the European Innovation Platform (EIP) in New Materials.

ITENE coordinates the project consortium formed by 19 partners from eight European countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Poland, Romania and Spain.
IMPACTPapeRec aims to put Europe at the forefront of paper for recycling (PfR) collection by providing an innovative and common knowledge platform. The innovative approach of the defined participatory strategy is based on the real engagement of the whole paper value chain including research, industry, policies, standards, municipalities and citizens.
 


 

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Press Release | 16 Jan.2017

Test Exemptions now included in Deinking Scorecard

The recently-revised deinkability scorecard by the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) now includes an annex listing exemptions to the deinkability test. With this annex, the widely-used deinkability scorecard takes account of those printing technologies and material combinations that are sure to deliver good deinkability results, based on past experiences. Testing remains a requirement for processes and material combinations for which there is not enough experience on their deinkability behaviour. The annex will be subject to future revisions based on new data.

The ERPC approach to deinkability, i.e. by testing and assessing results with a scorecard on the one hand and by exempting certain paper / printing technology combinations on the other hand is an effective way to secure high quality recycling while being cost-effective for the producers of printed products” says Henri Vermeulen, ERPC Chairman.

Recent suggestions that the European Commission would not extend EU Ecolabel for tissue paper and newsprint among others give reason to believe that other paper-related Ecolabels are also under threat. These could include the Ecolabel on printed paper products, where deinkability is one criterion. “Deinking is an important part of the recycling process and therefore a key issue for the sustainability of printed paper products. The EU Ecolabel is a strong supporter of their recycling and their recyclability. We urge policymakers to recognise the tangible value of the EU Ecolabel” says Ulrich Leberle, ERPC secretary.

The new deinking scorecard is available here

For more information, please contact the ERPC Secretariat, Ulrich Leberle, at
+32 2 627 49 23, +32 479 90 59 21, erpc@cepi.org or visit www.paperforrecycling.eu


Notes to Editor:

The European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) was set up as an industry self-initiative in November 2000 to monitor progress towards meeting the paper recycling targets set out in the 2000 European Declaration on Paper Recycling. Since then the commitments in the Declaration are renewed every five years. In 2001 the ERPC committed itself to meeting and maintaining both a voluntary recycling rate target of 70% in the EU27 plus Switzerland and Norway by 2015 as well as qualitative targets in areas such as waste prevention, ecodesign, and research and development. In 2016, Members of the ERPC are ACE, CEPI, CITPA, EMFA, ERPA, ETS, FEPE, INGEDE and INTERGRAF. Supporters are Afera, EuPIA, FINAT and RADTECH Europe. The European Commission, DG Environment and DGGrow, are permanent observers to the ERPC.
 

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Press Release | 05 Dec.2016

CEPI increases focus on technical measurement in revised Paper for Recycling Quality Control guidelines

CEPI has published an updated version of the ‘Paper for Recycling – Quality control guidelines’ including an annex which outlines in more detail the technical measurements.
The updated version is the result of sustained industry consultation and as a step towards achieving a harmonised approach on quality control and measurement. The additional annex provides more detailed information on:


1. Instrumental analysis via automatic sensor Near Infra-Red (NIR)
2. Instrumental analysis via automatic microwave sensor

The updated guidelines were first launched in April 2016 with the objective to improve the implementation of the revised EN 643 Standard and to facilitate commercial relationships of paper mills with their suppliers of paper for recycling.


“The inclusion of the annex reflects the trend of paper companies increasingly using technical measurement in their quality control. The focus on quality is crucial for the functioning of secondary raw material markets and makes paper recycling a role model for the circular economy.” says Massimo Medugno, Director General of Assocarta, CEPI’s member in Italy.

While CEPI remains actively engaged in the ongoing standardisation process on the sampling of paper for recycling, the present guidelines are much wider in scope.

They put strong emphasis on the inspection procedure for quality control at the paper mill and explain what controllers should consider during an inspection in order to decide if a load should be accepted, conditionally accepted or refused. The control procedure recommended is described in detail and illustrated by a ‘decision tree’ at the end of the document.

CEPI strongly encourages its member companies to apply the new guidelines in the purchasing Paper for Recycling market.
English and French versions of the revised Guidelines can be consulted on our website here.
 

For more information, please contact: Ulrich Leberle, Raw Materials Director at CEPI: u.leberle@cepi.org, +32 2 627 49 23
 

For press related enquiries please contact: Ben Kennard, Press & Digital Media Officer at CEPI: b.kennard@cepi.org , +32 487 39 21 82

Note to the Editor

The European Standard EN 643, European List of Standard Grades of Paper and Board for Recycling, is the basic document to be used by industry professionals in the buying and selling of paper for recycling. Interested parties should order the EN 643 from their respective national standardisation body. The standard was revised in 2014. It defines what the different grades of paper for recycling can and cannot contain as well as defining prohibited materials and unwanted materials. It also sets maximum tolerance levels by grade for unwanted materials.

 

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Publication | 02 Dec.2016

Paper for Recycling Quality Control Guidelines

The European Standard EN 643, European list of standard grades of paper and board for recycling, is the basic document to be used by industry professionals in the buying and selling of paper for recycling. Interested parties should order the EN 643 from their respective national standardisation body1. The standard was revised in 2013 and published in February 2014. It defines what the different grades of paper for recycling can and cannot contain as well as defining prohibited materials and unwanted materials. It also sets maximum tolerance levels by grade for unwanted materials.

Specific agreements between buyer and supplier for grades with special specifications might still be necessary to meet individual requirements. However, general recommendations are needed to facilitate a common understanding of the standard.

To achieve greater harmonisation, to improve the implementation of the EN 643 Standard and to facilitate commercial relationships between paper mills and paper for recycling suppliers, these guidelines contain recommendations regarding paper for recycling quality controls for paper for recycling suppliers and paper mills.

The guidelines can be consulted in English here and French here.

News | 07 Nov.2016

IMPACTPapeRec Project Conference and Networking Informative Meeting

IMPACTPapeRec invites you to join the Project Conference and Informative Meeting to be held 24 January in Barcelona, Spain.


Join us to learn more and share your insights on how separate collection of paper for recycling in Europe can be enhanced.


Date and location

The IMPACTPapeRec Project Conference and Networking Informative Meeting will take place 24 January at:
Museo y Centro Estudios del Deporte Doctor Melcior Colet
Carrer de Buenos Aires, 56 (08036 – Barcelona, Spain)

Registration and further info

Registration is free of charge in the framework of the IMPACTPapeRec project supported by the EU. Please click here to fill in the registration form to book a seat in the Project Conference and/or the Networking Informative Meeting. If you need further support or information, please contact the local organizer ITENE by e-mail (registro@itene.com) or phone 0034 96 182 00 00. Full event information including the agenda is available here.

Publication | 26 Oct.2016

ERPC Monitoring Report 2015

Summary:

Since 2000, the European paper value chain has demonstrated its commitment to the two-fold aim of increasing recycling rates and joining efforts to remove obstacles hampering paper recycling in Europe. Consistent with this, in 2011, the signatories of the European Declaration on Paper Recycling declared their commitment to reach 70% paper recycling by 2015.

And we not only achieved but exceeded this target. In 2015, 71.5% of all paper consumed in Europe was recycled, corresponding to 1.2 million tonnes more than the 70% target. Paper consumption has slightly increased compared to 2014, reaching 82.5 million tonnes. Compared to the base year of the Declaration (2010), collection and recycling of paper has increased by 1.4%, corresponding to 0.8 million tonnes of paper.

Considering the Declaration period as a whole, we have seen a considerable increase in the recycling rate in the first half of the period, but the rate has stabilised since then.

We are quite clearly starting to reach maximum potential, since 22% of paper consumption cannot be collected or recycled e.g. wallpaper, hypiene paper.

This situation is linked to changing consumption patterns affecting the most recycled paper products. Newspaper consumption has continued to decline in 2015. Equally, increased consumption of corrugated boxes, the other most recycled paper product, is only partly compensating the effect on the overall recycling rate of declining graphic (printing and writing) paper consumption.

Despite the now limited potential for further improvements in the recycling rate, we are still aiming higher. In fact, as this report is being printed, a new, even more ambitious commitment for 2016-2020 is being prepared. This will keep the industry moving on its path towards ever-higher recycling rates.

In 2015, we can also notice positive achievements at the regional level, despite differences between regions continuing to exist. The number of countries with a recycling rate below 60% has dropped to 10, 2 less than 2010, but one more than 2014. Over the last year, the number of countries exceeding recycling rates of 70% was 15, just like the year before.

On an international level, Europe continues to be the world leader in paper recycling followed by North America. Other world regions’ paper recycling rates are improving, but starting from lower levels. In Europe, paper fibres are reused 3.5 times on average, while the world average is only 2.4. While the EU is discussing ways to move into a circular economy, the paper fibre loop can serve as a model for circularity. Paper recycling is an industry “Made in Europe”. It prolongs value creation and job opportunities in Europe from a renewable, predominantly European resource, wood.

CEPI is a Signatory Member of the ERPC and holds its secretariat.

ERPC website: www.paperforrecycling.eu

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Publication | 26 Oct.2016

Novel bio-based products from side streams of paper and board production

The paper and board production process, especially when carried out with paper for recycling as the raw material, leads to the generation of large amounts of side streams, mainly sludges, rejects and process water. The main two outlets for the European paper and board industry’s (PBI) solid side streams have historically been landfilling and incineration. Both of them entail significant costs for the sector, while landfilling has been recently facing also regulatory limitations in several countries. Reducing these costs, and even turning them into profits, depends on the ability of the sector to utilise the valuable components in the side streams by reusing them internally or converting them to intermediates or products for other parties.

This publication includes the work done in the framework of the EU-funded Reffibre project, as well as the 2011 CEPI Maximum value from paper for recycling: Towards a multi-product paper mill project report. 

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Press Release | 20 Oct.2016

Paper recycling chain exceeds its voluntary commitment

European Paper Recycling at 71.5% in 2015

The paper recycling rate in Europe reached an impressive 71.5% as announced by the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) in their final monitoring report for 2015. Compared to 2010, collection and recycling has increased by almost one million tonnes of paper. This is due in part to the excellent work of the ERPC.

The 2015 European paper recycling rate of 71.5% is 1.5% higher than the target set by the ERPC in the 3rd European Declaration on Paper Recycling for the period 2010-2015. We are proud to report on the impressive work completed, following the pledge it first made in 2000 to expand paper recycling in Europe.

“The efforts of the ERPC perfectly complement EU policy on Circular Economy. The paper fibre loop can serve as the perfect model for circularity”, says ERPC Chairman Henri Vermeulen. “All 13 ERPC associations are proud to be part of a value chain ‘Made in Europe’, prolonging value creation and job opportunities”, he added.

In addition to the quantitative progress, a lot of qualitative work was done, particularly with initiatives to facilitate the recycling process and increase recycling activity. These notably include collection and applying ecodesign to paper products.

For the commitment period of 2011 to 2015, EY has independently verified the recycling rate calculations. Currently, a new ambitious commitment for 2016-2020 is being prepared. This will keep the industry moving on its path towards ever-higher recycling rates.

For more information, please contact the ERPC Secretariat, Ulrich Leberle, at +32 2 627 49 23, erpc@cepi.org or visit www.paperforrecycling.eu

Notes to Editor:

  • Download link for the 2015 Monitoring Report: http://www.paperforrecycling.eu/uploads/Modules/Publications/MonitoringReport2015final.pdf 
  • The European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) was a self-initiative set up in November 2000 to monitor progress towards meeting the paper recycling targets set out in the 2000 European Declaration on Paper Recycling. Since then the commitments in the Declaration are renewed every five years. In 2011 the ERPC committed itself to meeting and maintaining both a voluntary recycling rate target of 70% in the EU27 plus Switzerland and Norway by 2015 as well as reaching qualitative targets in areas such as waste prevention, ecodesign, and R&D.
  • As of 2016, ERPC’s signatories are ACE, CEPI, CITPA, EMFA, ERPA, ETS, FEPE, INGEDE, INTERGRAF. The supporters are AFERA, EuPIA, FINAT and RADTECH Europe. The European Commission (DG Environment and DG Grow) are permanent observers to ERPC.

 

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Position paper | 20 May.2016

The paper packaging industry’s on Directive 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste (PPWD) and Directive 2008/98/EC on waste (WFD)

Paper Packaging Coordination Group (PPCG)

Introduction
The Paper Packaging Coordination Group comprises the major European paper and board packaging associations representing the interests of a wide range of packaging products used in transport, retail and consumer packaging. Paper and board packaging is based on a renewable resource (the forest) and is recyclable. We support the concept of a circular economy in which raw materials are sourced from renewable, responsibly-managed resources and recycled after use.


1. Recycling targets for paper and board
Key messages:
• The proposed targets are ambitious, reflect technical and economic realities and can be achieved.
• Packaging recycling targets should be at comparable levels between different consumer packaging materials. High achievement of one packaging material should not compensate for another material’s lower achievement.
• We welcome the proposal that waste exported outside Europe should count towards the target of the Member State where it has been collected on condition that recycling takes place in equivalent environmental conditions.

We welcome the proposed targets for paper and board by the Commission. The paper and board packaging industry in Europe has achieved high recycling rates. In 2014, the average paper and board packaging recycling rate was 81.1% (CEPI). The EUROSTAT figure for 2011 was 79.9%. However, there are also significant differences between Member States, with the recycling rate ranging from 59% to 98% (EUROSTAT). Calculation methods for recycling vary between countries, making it difficult to compare existing data from different countries.


2. Recycling rate calculation
Key messages:
• We support quality recycling.
• We support the harmonised method based on “input to final recycling process”.
• Calculation formulas should be adapted and clarified with regards to “preparation for re-use and recycling” of “products and components” for packaging
We believe the “input” to the final recycling process is the correct basis for calculating the recycling rate and will improve the quality of recycling.

Recommendations:

Final recycling process
• Article 1(2f) of the proposal for amending the WFD with a definition of “final recycling process” should read as follows: “final recycling process” means the recycling process which begins when no further mechanical sorting operation is needed and when waste and waste considered to have ceased to be waste in accordance with Article 6 enter a production process and are effectively reprocessed into products, materials or substances”.
• Article 1(5a) (i) should be consistent with the new definition of final recycling process. Therefore Article 6 (1c) of the WFD should therefore be amended as follows: “the substance or object fulfils the technical requirements for the final recycling process and meets the existing standards and legislation applicable to products.”

Derogation
• The derogation article 11a paragraph 3(a) and (b) of the proposed amendments to the WFD and derogation article 6a paragraph 3 (a) and 3(b) of the proposed amendments to the PPWD should read as follows: “The weight of materials or substances that are not subject to a final recycling process and that are disposed or subject to energy recovery remains below the maximum threshold of impurities acceptable to operators carrying out a final recycling process in order to ensure quality recycling. These thresholds are outlined in Annex VII”. There should be a new annex VII on impurities limits per waste stream, in which the impurities limit for paper (non-paper components and other unwanted materials) should be set at 3% in line with the EN 643.

 

Packaging is different from the other waste streams, which the European Commission already acknowledges by having a dedicated directive for packaging and packaging waste. Packaging which is re-used in a closed loop is not considered as waste and only becomes waste when it leaves the loop. Mixing waste and non-waste (“products and components”) in one calculation formula will jeopardise the potential a harmonised method could have to deliver robust, comparable and accurate reporting. This, combined with an optional reporting on “products and components” will lead to increasing differences in the Member States’ reporting. It may also trigger cases where targets are met by clever calculations without an effective contribution to the circular economy. The resources needed from the European Commission to control the accurate implementation of the formula would be disproportionate to the potential benefits.

Recommendations:
Calculation method and formula
• The formula in Annex IV of the PPWD should be clarified to avoid misinterpretations, under claims or over claims and allow for fair treatment of packaging, considering the intrinsic differences among materials.
• For packaging, the proposed Article 6a), paragraph 1c) should be deleted. Member States should not be optionally allowed to include in the calculation “products and components prepared for re-use”.
• For packaging, “R” should be removed from the formula in Annex IV.
• The denominator “P” should be clearly explained by defining “packaging waste generated”, as, for example, “total packaging placed on the market”.


3. Minimum requirements for Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR)
Key messages:
• EPR systems should be transparent.
• The scope of EPR and roles and responsibilities of each actor involved in packaging waste management should be clearly defined.
• A minimum requirement for EPR systems to collect all (packaging) materials should be introduced.
• A reference to EPR systems needs to be made in PPWD (94/62/EC) to ensure the protection of the internal market, and in the WFD (2008/98/EC).

We welcome the Commission’s intention to make EPR systems transparent as well as the inclusion of three important elements in the Commission’s proposal for general requirements for EPR systems: Eco-modulation, optimised cost and secondary raw materials sales revenues. Recyclability is a key criterion in eco-modulation for EPR systems andensures the value from the sales of secondary raw material. As the additional cost for their collection can be covered by these revenues, the contribution of producers should be lower. Within every material category, criteria for eco-modulation should be carefully designed so they do not inhibit innovation, technical progress, the functioning of the internal market and specific requirements regarding the packed products.
The provisions on general requirements for EPR systems should describe the costs to be covered without using non-exhaustive lists.


Recommendations:
• Article 1(8) 4. (a) first paragraph of the proposal for amending the WFD should read as follows: “Cover the following cost of waste management for the products it puts on the Union market:…”
• The packaging sector should be recognised as a stakeholder in the EPR process so that it can share its expertise in managing the different materials


4. Separate collection, Landfill and Incineration of waste

Key messages:
• Recyclable packaging waste should not go to landfill. We support the ban on landfilling separately collected waste.
• Separate collection of all packaging waste should be strengthened and clarified.
• Incineration of recyclables should be restricted.

The requirement for separate collection of recyclable packaging waste is a precondition to avoid landfilling. The proposal aims in the right direction by linking the provisions on landfill restrictions to the separate collection requirement in the WFD and by introducing a methodology to measure the recycling rate at the input to a final recycling process, and by defining this final recycling process.

Despite the existing capacity for reprocessing paper in Europe, up to 10 million tonnes of all paper, including packaging, are currently being landfilled or incinerated in Europe. This situation has to be addressed, otherwise ambitious recycling targets cannot be achieved.

Paper and board should be collected separately from other recyclables such as plastics, metal, glass – or any combination thereof - and residual waste. Separate collection of all packaging and packaging waste is crucial in order to promote a circular economy and guarantee a high quality of secondary raw materials. The WFD formulated a separate collection target in 2008, but this has been interpreted in different ways by Member States. Beverage cartons (consisting predominantly of board) should be collected in the most optimal way for further recycling, which may differ from country to country.

Recommendations:
• Article 11(1) of the WFD should be amended by changing ”for the relevant recycling sectors” to “for the relevant final recycling processes”.
• Article 11(11) of the WFD should be amended to clarify that paper shall be collected separately from metal, plastic and glass.


5. Unlock the potential of Renewable, Bio-Based Materials
Key message:
• EU circular economy policies and measures should promote and encourage the use of bio-based materials as an essential solution to achieve a real circular economy.

The increased use of packaging made from bio-based materials fosters the establishment of a truly circular economy by taking into account an efficient use of renewable resources (biomass), integrated production and efficient use of bio-based feedstock in integrated bio-refineries. A true circular economy needs to be built on renewable carbon.
This logic should be extended to the legislative proposals under the circular economy package, in particular for sectors where solutions are already available, e.g. packaging. Therefore, the signatories request the recognition and encouragement of the use of materials from renewable sources in the PPWD.
Furthermore, using renewable, bio-based materials decreases Europe’s dependence on the import of raw materials and supports green development within the EU, leading to green growth and jobs.
 

Recommendations:
• Amend the PPWD with the explicit requirement for Member States to encourage the use of bio-based materials for the manufacturing of packaging, where appropriate.
• Introduce a clear definition of what is meant by ‘bio-based’ to ensure coherent interpretation and a level-playing field for producers. The signatories recommend using existing definitions of the CEN Technical Committee TC 411 on bio-based products which define ‘bio-based’ as “derived from biomass” and ‘biomass’ as “material of biological origin excluding material embedded in geological formations and/or fossilised”.


6. Food waste
Key messages:
• We support the efforts of the Commission to reduce the generation of food waste.
• Cooperation among all stakeholders in the food supply chain and the Commission is needed.
Packaging prevents food loss and food waste in a sustainable way. UN studies support the fact that a substantial reduction of food losses can be achieved by providing and using the right packaging solution.

Recommendations:
• The methodologies (paragraph 4) developed by the Commission should consider the positive role of packaging in the prevention of food waste.
• The packaging sector should be among the stakeholders consulted on the subject.

Currently, the following organisations participate in the PPCG:

CEPI, Confederation of European Paper Industries
CITPA, International Confederation of Paper & Board Converters
ACE, The Alliance for Beverage Cartons and the Environment
ECMA, European Carton Makers Association
EMBALPACK, European Association of Makers of Packaging Papers
EMFA, European Moulded Fibre Association
CEPI EUROKRAFT, European Producers of Sack Kraft Paper and Kraft Paper
CEPI CONTAINERBOARD, European Producers of corrugated case materials
EUROSAC, European Federation of Multiwall Paper Sack Manufacturers
FEFCO, European Federation of Corrugated Board Manufacturers
PRO CARTON, European Association of Carton and Cartonboard Manufacturers

 The position paper can be downloaded here.

Publication | 04 Apr.2016

Paper for Recycling Quality Control guidelines

The European Standard EN 643, European list of standard grades of paper and board for recycling, is the basic document to be used by industry professionals in the buying and selling of paper for recycling. Interested parties should order the EN 643 from their respective national standardisation body . The standard was revised in 2013. It defines what the different grades of paper for recycling can and cannot contain as well as defining prohibited materials and unwanted materials. It also sets maximum tolerance levels by grade for unwanted materials.

Specific agreements between buyer and supplier for grades with special specifications might still be necessary to meet individual requirements. However, general recommendations are needed to facilitate a common understanding of the standard.

To achieve greater harmonisation, to improve the implementation of the EN 643 Standard and to facilitate commercial relationships between paper mills and paper for recycling suppliers, these guidelines contain recommendations regarding paper for recycling quality controls for paper for recycling suppliers and paper mills.

The publication is now available in French
 

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Press Release | 04 Apr.2016

European paper industry launches revised Paper for Recycling Quality Control guidelines

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) has revised its guidelines on Paper for Recycling quality control, with recommendations for Paper for Recycling suppliers and paper mills. The objective of the guidelines publication is to achieve greater harmonisation, to improve the implementation of the EN 643 Standard and to facilitate commercial relationships between paper mills and paper for recycling suppliers.

The revised guidelines put a strong emphasis on the inspection procedure for quality control at the paper mill and explain what controllers should consider during an inspection in order to decide if a load should be accepted, conditionally accepted or refused. After a general control, further important parameters for quality control are named, i.e. bale conditions, moisture control and control of unwanted materials. The control procedure recommended is described in detail and illustrated by a decision tree at the end of the document.

The guidelines give furthermore recommendations on the level of information for suppliers, documentation and staff education.

CEPI will organise a free webinar in the weeks to come, to present the revised guidelines and to answer any questions that may arise.

You can download the publication at: http://bit.ly/1ouOkFm

For more information, please contact: Ulrich Leberle, Raw Materials Director at CEPI: u.leberle@cepi.org, +32 2 627 49 23.
 

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Publication | 02 Mar.2016

Design and Management for Circularity – the Case of Paper

The European paper industry was invited to collaborate with the World Economic Forum (the Forum), the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and the McKinsey Center for Business and Environment on Circular Economy to produce a white paper with guidelines on design and management for circularity. The new publication provides essential guidance to all actors in the supply chain through simple ecodesign rules for paper products, without limiting innovation and the introduction of new techniques. This is a product of the three pilots under Project MainStream, launched during the 2014 summit in Davos.

Although highly recyclable, paper is usually converted by industries that add chemicals to it through printing inks and other auxiliary materials. This can lead to problems in subsequent circular chains, as these chemicals cannot easily be removed from the paper before re-entering the mill. Furthermore, the already highly-optimised recycling process cannot follow the speed of the evolution of inks and toners.

The publication summarises the key choices to be made by direct (printers, papermakers, collectors) and indirect (such as local authorities, ink producers, equipment manufacturers) stakeholders. More specifically, it identifies the choices that can influence businesses ordering a fibre-based product - printed paper, packaging or other.

Read the press release on the topic.

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Press Release | 02 Mar.2016

Circular Economy for paper: Better design and management guidelines

A World Economic Forum publication in collaboration with industry

The European paper industry was invited to collaborate with the World Economic Forum (the Forum), the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and the McKinsey Center for Business and Environment on Circular Economy to produce a white paper with guidelines on design and management for circularity. The new publication provides essential guidance to all actors in the supply chain through simple ecodesign rules for paper products, without limiting innovation and the introduction of new techniques. This is a product of the three pilots under Project MainStream, launched during the 2014 summit in Davos.

“We trust helping circular thinking in all steps of the complex value chain will help reach higher in what is already a high recycling performance”, said CEPI Sustainability Director Jori Ringman, one of the draftsmen of the guidance, in a panel discussion on the feasibility of higher recycling rates at the Packaging and Sustainability event in Brussels on Wednesday. “In circular economy, your downstream is your upstream and what you pass on into the loop will have an impact on your own business.”

Although highly recyclable, paper is usually converted by industries that add chemicals to it through printing inks and other auxiliary materials. This can lead to problems in subsequent circular chains, as these chemicals cannot easily be removed from the paper before re-entering the mill. Furthermore, the already highly-optimised recycling process cannot follow the speed of the evolution of inks and toners.

The publication summarises the key choices to be made by direct (printers, papermakers, collectors) and indirect (such as local authorities, ink producers, equipment manufacturers) stakeholders. More specifically, it identifies the choices that can influence businesses ordering a fibre-based product - printed paper, packaging or other.

“Businesses will have many priorities topping their agendas, such as meeting customer requirements, creating functionalities that meet both the purpose and profitability, and respecting environmental considerations”, says Ringman. “This document is meant to make decision-making in companies easier when balancing these priorities.”

You can view the publication at: http://bit.ly/1T7vLVb and download it at: http://bit.ly/1QqTqdt.

For more information, please contact Jori Ringman at j.ringman@cepi.org, mobile: +32 478 25 50 70.


Note to the Editor

Project MainStream is a collaboration between the World Economic Forum, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation and the McKinsey Center for Business and Environment, seeking to remove bottlenecks in the large-scale transitioning to the circular economy.

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 505 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 920 paper mills. Together they represent 23% of world production.

 

 

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Press Release | 09 Feb.2016

Boosting the Circular Economy: European project to promote separate paper collection launched

IMPACTPapeRec is a European project to further increase the separate collection of paper for recycling and promote appropriate schemes to avoid landfilling and incineration.

• A best practice handbook will be developed to support the different EU regions in the implementation of best collection procedures.


IMPACTPapeRec started on 1 February 2016 for a period of two years and is financed by the European Union Horizon 2020 programme. It has evolved from a commitment on separate paper collection in the European Innovation Partnership on Raw Materials.


36 experts from eight countries representing research institutes, municipalities, obliged producers, paper industry and NGOs gathered in Valencia, Spain, to kick off the project and plan the activities for the next few months.


The project focuses on countries with below average paper recycling rates such as Bulgaria, Poland and Romania as well as countries where paper from households, small shops and offices is often collected in a commingled stream with other recyclables like in France and the UK. The participants started discussing the existing schemes as well as indicators to define best practice separate collection schemes.


Antonio Dobon from the project coordinator ITENE said: “We are very excited about the start of the project. It comes at a time when the European Commission presented its proposal for a Circular Economy stressing the importance of separate collection. With this project we will work to reach the recycling targets in those territories that are below the average. We will also seek for Paper for Recycling collection practices that allow reach both environmental and economic benefits. For doing so, we will define these best practices and spread them widely in Europe so that other municipalities can adopt them”.

IMPACTPapeRec is a consortium of 19 partners from 8 countries, i.e. Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria France, Germany, Poland, Romania and Spain. IMPACTPapeRec aims to put Europe at the forefront of paper for recycling (PfR) collection by providing an innovative and common knowledge platform. The innovative approach of the defined participatory strategy is based on the real engagement of the whole paper value chain including research, industry, policies, standards, municipalities and citizens.

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 690182

PARTNERS


For more information:
Ulrich Leberle, CEPI Raw Materials Director, Tel: +32 2 627 4923, u.leberle@cepi.org

The press release is also available in French.
 

 

 

 

 

 

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News | 03 Dec.2015

European paper industry's views on the Circular Economy package

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) welcomes the long-awaited Circular Economy package that was launched by the European Commission. By recognising the contribution of biomass and bio-based products to the Circular Economy the European Commission now takes into account that circularity in many cases starts with raw materials from renewable sources. CEPI is looking forward to concrete actions in the field of bio-based product in the future. In addition, the European Commission has recognised the importance of ending waste management options that do not create value for Europe. CEPI also believes that the Commission is right in recognising recyclability as waste prevention and in harmonising the method for the calculation of recycling rates to make data more comparable and reliable. The European paper industry, together with its partners in the paper value chain, is about to publish the European Declaration on Paper Recycling committing to a further increase in paper recycling from today’s already high 71,7% paper recycling rate.

Read the full press release here.

Press Release | 02 Dec.2015

European Commission delivers value: Circular Economy package recognises renewability and closes the loop

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) welcomes the Circular Economy package that was launched by the European Commission today. “Our expectations have been met. This major policy initiative has correctly identified the synergies needed to find real solutions. The package has reached a level of ambition rarely seen in policymaking,” says Marco Mensink, CEPI Director General.


By recognising the contribution of biomass and bio-based products to the Circular Economy the European Commission now takes into account that circularity in many cases starts with raw materials from renewable sources. CEPI is looking forward to concrete actions in the field of bio-based product in the future.


In addition, the European Commission has recognised the importance of ending waste management options that do not create value for Europe.


Marco Mensink says: “It is great to see that the Commission recognises the need for separate collection of paper, providing good quality raw materials. We also appreciate that further limits to landfilling are being put in place”. This is a file where the needs of industry closely align with many other stakeholder positions. The Commission proposes a logical step forward. “A step that should be taken from legislation to reality as soon as possible.”


CEPI also believes that the Commission is right in recognising recyclability as waste prevention and in harmonising the method for the calculation of recycling rates to make data more comparable and reliable. The European paper industry, together with its partners in the paper value chain, is about to publish the European Declaration on Paper Recycling committing to a further increase in paper recycling from today’s already high 71,7% paper recycling rate.


For more information, please contact Annette Requardt at a.requardt@cepi.org, mobile +32 489 84 8950


Note to the Editor
CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 505 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 920 paper mills. Together they represent 23% of world production.

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Press Release | 01 Dec.2015

The Paper Packaging Industry’s view on the Circular Economy Legislative Package

The Paper Packaging Coordination Group comprises the major European paper and board packaging associations¹ which represent the interests of a wide range of packaging products used in transport, retail and consumer packaging. Paper and board packaging is based on a renewable resource (the forest) and is recyclable. We support the concept of a Circular Economy in which raw materials are sourced from renewable, responsibly managed resources and where possible, recycled after use.

The members of our associations are directly affected by proposals in the Circular Economy legislative package published today, which amend the waste and packaging waste legislation. We will submit our detailed responses to specific proposals when we have had time to study them, but meanwhile we wish to present our joint approach on the major topics which affect us:

1. Recycling targets for paper and board
• Targets should be ambitious and reflect technical and economic realities
• For materials, a clear focus on recycling should be ensured
• Packaging recycling targets should be proportionate between different consumer packaging materials, fairly taking into account each material’s situation, achievements and potential for improvement. High achievement of one packaging material should not compensate for another material’s lower achievement.

2. Need to revise the calculation method before setting new targets
• The method for the calculation of recycling rates should be harmonised, providing clarity and simplification for ease of application
• The “input” method should be the basis of the calculation
• EU requirements for recycling should apply equally to exports of paper for recycling and should be enforced

3. Design of packaging
• Additional mandatory design requirements at national level for packaging will undermine the objectives of the Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive (PPWD)

4. Composition of municipal waste
• Retailers should have the freedom to choose the method of collection of their secondary and tertiary packaging waste

5. Minimum requirements for Extended Producer Responsibility
• The scope of EPR and roles and responsibilities of each actor involved in packaging waste management should be clearly defined

6. Landfill and incineration of waste
• Recyclables should not be sent to landfill
• Separate collection of materials should be strengthened
• Incineration of recyclables should be restricted

7. Ecodesign and product design
• The essential requirements in the PPWD and related CEN standards are sufficient to provide guidance for ecodesign of packaging
• Packaging should serve the functionality and the safety of the product first
• Packaging should not be seen in isolation from the product
• Ecodesign concepts as part of a product’s design, should encompass the whole life cycle of the product with its packaging

8. Renewability of material resources
• Renewability of material resources is a natural driver for circularity and should be an essential element of a Circular Economy

We particularly welcome the consideration of the role of the bioeconomy in Circular Economy thinking, as we have strongly advocated that sustainable, natural, renewable resources play an essential role in completing the loop of a Circular Economy.

For further information please read the Paper Packaging Coordination Group’s position paper on the Circular Economy package: http://www.cepi.org/positionpaper/PPCGcirculareconomy

 
¹Currently the following organisations participate in the Paper Packaging Coordination Group:

CEPI, Confederation of European Paper Industries
CEPI Containerboard, European industry association of producers of corrugated case materials
CITPA, International Confederation of Paper & Board Converters
ACE, The Alliance for Beverage Cartons and the Environment
ECMA, European Carton Makers Association
EMBALPACK, European Association of Makers of Packaging Papers
EMFA, European Moulded Fibre Association
CEPI EUROKRAFT, European Producers of Sack Kraft Paper and Kraft Paper
EUROSAC, European Federation of Multiwall Paper Sack Manufacturers
FEFCO, European Federation of Corrugated Board Manufacturers
PRO CARTON, European Association of Carton and Cartonboard Manufacturers
 

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Publication | 22 Oct.2015

ERPC Monitoring Report 2014

Summary:

Since 2000, the European paper value chain has been committed to the two-fold aim of increasing recycling and joining efforts to remove obstacles hampering paper recycling in Europe. Consequently, today’s situation is transformed relative to what we experienced 15 years ago.

In 2014, 71.7% of all paper consumed in Europe was recycled, totalling 58 million tonnes. Compared to the previous year, that represents an increase of 0.7%. Paper consumption has increased by the slightly higher figure of 1.2% compared to 2013, reaching 81 million tonnes. Currently, 22% of paper consumption cannot be collected or recycled. We are clearly nearing maximum potential.

This situation is also linked to changing consumption patterns affecting the most recycled paper products. We have seen the continued decline of newspaper consumption in 2014. At the same time, the increased consumption of corrugated boxes has only partly compensated the challenge of declining graphic paper consumption for the overall recycling rate.

In 2014, we have also seen good achievements at the regional level, despite differences continuing to exist. The number of countries with recycling rates below 60% has
decreased, while the number of countries with a recycling rate above 70% has increased, compared to last year.

On an international level, Europe continues to be the world leader in paper recycling, followed by North America. Other world regions’ paper recycling rates have also improved, but starting from lower levels. In Europe, paper fibres have 3.5 loops on average, far above the global average of 2.4.

The paper fibre loop offers the current EU-level discussions on the circular economy a clear and workable model to be followed. Paper recycling is an industry “Made in Europe”. It prolongs value chains and creates green European jobs based on a renewable resource.

CEPI is a Signatory Member of the ERPC.

ERPC website: www.paperforrecycling.eu

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News | 15 Oct.2015

Polish primary school and Finnish university win 2015 paper recycling awards

Yesterday, the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) announced the winners of the fifth European Paper Recycling awards. The well-attended ceremony took place at the European Parliament and was hosted by MEP Eva Kaili who is also head of the Greek S&D delegation.


The winner of the Technology Improvement and R&D category was Aalto University and VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) with a new, innovative process for turning paper for recycling and cardboard into textile fibres called Ioncell-F.


Although producing textile fibres from cellulosic material is nothing new, the process submitted by Aalto University and VTT is innovative in two ways. Firstly, it allows for the production of fibres of quality equal or better than those deriving from similar processes. Their high strength also renders the fibres suitable as natural reinforcement in composite materials. Secondly, the process makes it possible to use lignin as a natural textile dye.


The Ioncell-F process is based on the use of a so-called ionic liquid to dissolve cellulosic waste material without the addition of toxic chemicals and spin fibres for the production of textiles and garments. “We’re happy to see this environmentally-friendly process already attracting considerable interest, even though it is still in a developmental phase”, said Michael Hummel, Postdoctoral researcher at Aalto University.


The winner of the Information and Education category was the Literatura za Makulature (Literature for Paper for Recycling) project, submitted by a primary school in the Tychy region of Poland. In order to encourage children to get involved in paper recycling, the school invited famous Polish authors to meet its pupils, paying for their participation with money raised from selling the paper for recycling brought to school by the children. The initiative is unique not only in Tychy but in Poland.
In his speech ERPC Chairman Henri Vermeulen stressed the role of the recycling awards. “It is our pleasure to highlight and reward innovative paper recycling projects coming from education institutions. Initiatives like these prove that the paper industry is already the perfect example of a circular economy”, he added.


Five more entries were commended by the jury: Ecofolio for their project ‘The Modulated Eco-Contribution Scale’, Papierenkarton.nlz o.o. for their ‘Papier & Karton Educational Programme’ (Information and Education category); PTS Papiertechnische Stiftung for ‘Advanced treatment of recycled pulp by use of hydrodynamic cavitation pulses’, Alucha & SCA Hygiene Products for ‘REFILLS (Recovering of Energy and FILLers from Sludge)’ and Kadant International for ‘Polycup recycling at James Cropper speciality papers’ (Technology Improvement and R&D category).


Photos from the awards and presentations given by the winners are available at www.paperforrecycling.eu/recycling-awards. The next edition of the ERPC recycling awards will be organised in 2017. For more information, please contact the ERPC Secretariat, Ulrich Leberle, at +32 2 627 49 23, +32 479 90 59 21 or erpc@cepi.org.