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European Paper Week 2014

Registrations are open!

 

Paper recycling in Europe at 71.7% !

A reliable performance secures access to valuable raw material. Read our press release

 

Resource efficiency - Making more from our natural resources

See our new publication with concrete examples from the industry!

 

European Paper Week video wins Applied Arts Design Awards 2013

The teaser video made for European Paper Week won the first prize in the category Motion Design of the Canadian magazine AppliedArts!

 

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11 Sep.2014 ,

Alliance of Energy Intensive Industries renews calls for ‘carbon leakage’ protection

The Alliance of Energy Intensive Industries (AEII) has published an open letter  to the heads of State and Governments of the EU Member States, the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union and the European Commission on carbon leakage. CEPI is part of this alliance.


The 2030 climate and energy framework must guarantee predictability for industry by setting the principles for measures against carbon and investment leakage now.


The undersigned manufacturing industries are the foundation of Europe’s economic fabric, drivers of jobs and growth in Europe. We represent over 30 000 companies in the EU with more than 4 million direct jobs, and around 30 million jobs in our manufacturing value chains.


The EU should focus on promoting recovery and growth of industrial production in Europe, in line with the objective to reinstate industry’s share of EU GDP to 20% by 20201. European industries need a stable and long term legislative framework that effectively combines EU climate ambition with EU industrial competiveness.


Current carbon leakage provisions under the EU Emissions Trading Directive, if not revised rapidly, will result in a huge shortage in free allowances and increasing direct and indirect costs (the pass-through of carbon costs into power prices) for even the most efficient installations in Europe. In the period from 2021 to 2030, when the provisions against carbon leakage and free allocation would be phased out, our industries are expected to face hundreds of billions of Euros in direct costs and costs passed through in electricity prices.2 The impact on energy intensive industries will simply be overwhelming.


Knowing that the Commission will be looking at “an improved system of free allocation of allowances with a better focus” for 2021-2030 is not enough. Industry needs a clear outline of policy measures to effectively prevent the risk of carbon and investment leakage.

The Commission’s legislative proposals currently only cover EU ETS structural reforms, which increase both carbon prices as well as the unilateral burden on EU industry, and expose EU jobs and growth to aggravated carbon leakage risk. Unfortunately, the Commission intends to publish proposals to prevent carbon leakage only at a later stage.


This is contrary to the guidance resulting from the March 2014 European Council, instructing the Commission “to rapidly develop measures to prevent potential carbon leakage in order to ensure the competitiveness of Europe's energy-intensive industries”, and this to provide by October 2014 “the necessary stability and predictability for its economic operators”.


The European Parliament stressed in February 2014 “that the 2030 climate and energy policy targets must be technically and economically feasible for EU industries and that best performers should have no direct or indirect additional costs resulting from climate policies; [that] the provisions for carbon leakage should provide 100% free allocation of technically achievable benchmarks, with no reduction factor for carbon leakage sectors.” 3
We therefore urge the European Council to give guidance at its summit on 23/24 October confirming that carbon leakage measures will be continued after 2020, as well as outlining the principles for the level of protection in order to safeguard predictability, investment certainty, jobs and growth in Europe:


Until a global agreement on climate change provides for a level playing field for energy intensive sectors at risk of carbon and investment leakage, best performers should not be penalised by direct or indirect additional costs resulting from the framework. This implies:


- Truly 100% free allocation based on technically and economically achievable benchmarks (including heat and fuel based benchmarks), reflecting recent production, and without a correction factor.
- Harmonized off-setting of all CO2 costs passed through into electricity prices in all Member States.


The Market Stability Reserve must only be considered in conjunction with the above measures, instead of through piecemeal approach.
The undersigned energy intensive industries are all at risk of carbon and investment leakage and therefore must be safeguarded through the above measures
.


These measures provide the essential signal towards industry for predictability and investment certainty, and secure an environmentally and economically sound EU ETS which does not distort the market. We strongly believe that these measures, together with strong innovation funds to support breakthrough innovation in industrial technologies and processes, will offer a win-win situation for the global climate and the European economy.4
 

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1 European Commission Communication "For a European Industrial Renaissance", COM(2014) 14/2
2 The Commission expects a price of €40/tCO2 in 2030, modelling presented by Point Carbon expects ca. €48/tCO2 (source: www.ceps.eu/taskforce/review-eu-ets-issues); Climate Economics Chair calculates a price of up €70/tCO2 in a high scenario in its report EU ETS reform in the Climate-Energy Package 2030: First lessons from the ZEPHYR model, Paris 2014.
3 European Parliament resolution of 4 February 2014 on the Action Plan for a competitive and sustainable steel industry in Europe (2013/2177(INI))
4 The agreement on the reform of the EU ETS between the Dutch government, industry and NGOs proves that a compromise and a balanced solution between the pillars of EU sustainable policy – growth, jobs, and environmental protection – is possible by applying an allocation more closely linked to economic reality e.g. a dynamic emissions trading system.

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09 Jul.2014

CEPI adopts Load Transport guidelines for pulp and paper products

CEPI has just launched a guideline document on general cargo securing instructions for pulp and paper products. The document was produced by CEPI with the input of the CEPI Transport Network and the support of MariTerm AB. CEPI expects the industry to adopt it as a best practice.

The guidelines will help everyone involved in the transport chain (planning, preparation, supervision or control) ensure safe transportation. Valid for transport on road, the guidelines primarily focus on accelerations and forces and cover a wide variety of product types (reels, sheeted paper, etc.). They were based on the European standard EN 12195-1:2010 (load restraining on road vehicles – Safety – Part 1: Calculation of securing forces).

The document is split in two parts, starting with the basic cargo securing principles, such as lashing, sliding and tipping. The second and largest part deals with instructions for pulp and paper products in particular, detailing arrangements necessary to prevent movements sideways and in forward and backward direction.

The European pulp and paper industry continuously promotes a cost-efficient, sustainable and safe transport of its products and raw materials. These guidelines are available to all pulp and paper companies and stakeholders. Versions in various EU languages will soon be available to ensure a wider distribution and a broad implementation by European companies and supply chain partners.

You can download the document here.
 

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18 Jun.2014 ,

WWF press release: International plantation summit looks at forestry for the future

Cape Town is playing host to an international forestry meeting, the New Generation Plantations (NGP) annual summit that will look at challenges facing the forestry industry today. The summit, that takes place at the Vineyard Hotel in Cape Town on 18 and 19 June, will look at two of the most important and challenging forestry frontiers today, namely social forestry and land-use.


Also participants from agriculture sectors, such as the sugar industry, will be attending the summit, as the NGP aims to broaden and share its experiences and learning with agricultural sectors in a resilient landscape approach. Set up by WWF in 2007, NGP brings together companies, government forest agencies and conservationists from around the world to explore, share and promote better ways of planning and managing plantations. NGP seeks to engage with stakeholders, learn from them and to share these lessons. It is underpinned by the philosophy that well-managed plantations in the right places can take pressure off natural forests and eco-systems and improve the welfare of local communities. Read more about NGP experiences and achievements here.


A world with seven billion people requires forestry and farming practices that produce more with less land and water, while empowering communities to achieve their aspirations. In many rural areas, forestry companies, with their access to resources, are best placed to act as agents for development, but struggle to integrate social policies into their business.


Luis Neves Silva, the NGP manager from WWF International, explains: "NGP is a space of trust, bridging different worlds. It creates a zone for open discussions and exchange where we can learn from each other by seeing what others are doing faced with similar issues, and to better understand the concerns of other stakeholders. Instead of coming with the answers, NGP helps to frame the right questions.”


Over the two-day meeting, over a hundred conferees from 20 nationalities will put their heads together to come up with ideas about how to enable skilled, motivated local people to run successful forestry businesses and manage productive plantations on their land to secure supply, reduce risks, and benefit communities and investors.


According to Morné du Plessis, Chief Executive of WWF South Africa, “Forestry and agriculture are important elements of productive landscapes, but we need to plan plantations as living landscapes that provide broad benefits to local and downstream communities. It is no longer good enough to see agricultural and forestry land simply as only providing food and timber. We need to recognise that these landscapes also generate water, absorb carbon and harbour critical biodiversity, and they may help to control pests and pollinate crops.”


A joint learning journey will continue in the field at the next NGP study tour in South Africa in November “The resilient landscape approach to freshwater ecosystem stewardship”


Editor’s Notes:
About New Generations Plantation
The NGP platform is a place for sharing knowledge about good plantation practices and learning from experience, through events such as study tours, workshops and conferences.
Over the coming decades, plantations are set to expand at a rapid rate to meet growing demand for paper, timber and energy. While plantations can be controversial, the NGP concept suggests that well-managed plantations in the right places can take pressure off natural forests, work in harmony with natural ecosystems, and improve the welfare of local communities. Find out more at www.newgenerationplantations.org


About WWF
WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organisations, with almost six million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.
Ultimately our aim is to inspire all South Africans to live in harmony with nature for the well-being of our country and its people.


See www.wwf.org.za for more information on the organisation’s activities in South Africa.
WWF stands for the World Wide Fund for Nature. The organization prefers to be referred to just by the acronym.
You can follow WWF on twitter http://twitter.com/WWFSouthAfrica

For more information, images and interviews:
Andrea Weiss
media@wwf.org.za
+27 (0)82 920 5933
 

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07 May.2014

Council adopts legal acts for public and private partnerships

The Council of the European Union has adopted the legal acts for a new generation of public and private partnerships that will allow large-scale, long-term innovation projects to be carried out under the umbrella of Horizon 2020, the EU's research and innovation framework programme.
The innovation investment package, which implements the Innovation Union strategy to stimulate the creation of growth and jobs, will contribute to pool research and innovation investments up to 22 billion € in sectors facing major societal challenges in the next seven years.

Five public-private partnerships will be set up or further developed as Joint Technology Initiatives (JTIs). One of them is the bio-based industries ("BBI"), to develop new and competitive bio-based value chains that replace the need for fossil fuels and have a strong impact on rural development.  The industry is organised in a Bio-based Industries Consortium, with CEPI being one of its members.

The Consortium currently brings together more than 60 European large and small companies, clusters and organisations across technology, industry, agriculture and forestry. They have all committed to invest in collaborative research, development and demonstration of bio-based technologies within the Public Private Partnership (PPP).

You can find out more about it at http://www.biconsortium.eu/

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27 Mar.2014

CEPI receives two-star 'Ecodynamic company' label

The Brussels regional energy and environment agency renewed CEPI's two-star 'Ecodynamic company' label. This award is delivered to Brussels-based associations and companies with high environmental quality standards. 

We are very proud to have received this honour. A big thank you to the staff members who worked on the application and helped obtain the label. Here it is!

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12 Mar.2014

CEPI at the Innovation Convention 2014

CEPI had a stand at the European Commission's Innovation Convention next to Google glass and Microsoft!

Our stand was focused on Deep Eutectic Solvents, the winner of the Two Team Project. As you can in this photo, it was a big success. It gathered interest from participants with different profiles, ranging from European Commission employees to students, companies and scientists.

We would like to thank Sappi for providing the material for the stand as well as Eindhoven university for sending a PhD student who did an excellent job explaining the technical side of DES.

View all photos.
 

CEPI staff members explaining Deep Eutectic Solvents and the Two Team Project

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20 Dec.2013 ,

Regulatory and Market Aspects of Demand-Side Flexibility

Abstract from CEPI response to CEER public consultation


Background


The Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) has recently launched the public consultation “C13-PC-71: Regulatory and Market Aspects of Demand-Side Flexibility”.
Below an abstract from the CEPI response to main questions raised by CEER on:
1. main opportunities and benefits for demand-side flexibility;
2. main barriers to the emergence/functioning of demand-side flexibility;
3. most important 'preconditions' necessary for the emergence/functioning of demand-side flexibility


CEER Consultation Questions


1. What do you see as the main opportunities and benefits for demand-side flexibility in existing/future markets and network arrangements? How would you prioritise these?


1.1 Existing markets
The pulp and paper industry has already engaged, where possible, in demand-side programmes.
Mechanical pulping, an electro-intensive process, can be used for “peak shaving” programmes. It can react at reasonably short notice, like as short as 15 minutes and, depending on the frequency and schedule of interruptions, up to one hour. However, these are indicative figures, which need to be carefully assessed at mill level, as they will vary in function of the trade-offs between benefits from balancing the electricity system, the need to meet paper demand, and the overall economic impact that balancing the grid would have on the production process.


In some countries, paper production also participates in “valley filling” programmes: the whole industrial process is shifted to the night or to the weekends to optimise baseload electricity production. Example of this can be found, for instance, in Austria or Belgium. In Norway there are also provisions for flexibility markets where industry can participate. In this case, the transmission operator asks for bids.


The potentials for further exploring “peak shaving” or “valley filling” programmes are however limited. Beside auxiliary processes, the paper making process has little margins of flexibility when it comes to demand-reduction programmes. Moreover, most of the energy required from the sector (steam and electricity) are generated on-site, therefore mostly off the grid.


There is however quite some untapped potential if the market will develop flexible solutions for absorbing excess electricity supply at critical times (see next paragraph).


1.2 Future markets
One of the main criticalities of the electricity system is how to properly integrate electricity generated from “variable”, or “non-programmable” renewable energy sources (NP RES), like wind and solar, at a time of low or no demand. Curtailing these sources is particularly inefficient, as they produce at zero marginal prices. While most of R&D programmes are focussing on energy storage, the pulp and paper industry is in a rather unique position to potentially providing solutions to

  • efficiently absorbing excess of electricity supply,
  • while creating vale for the EU economy,


Most importantly, all this could be already delivered with current technologies.


To explain how this would be possible, few words on the pulp and paper industry are necessary.


CEPI represents 959 mills located in 18 European countries. According to our latest figures, in 2011 the European pulp and paper industry consumed 111 TWh of electricity, of which 57 TWh (52%) produced on-site via co-generation units. In 2011 the sector also consumed 557 TJ, or 155 TWh-equivalent, of heat, all on-site generated.


Combining the two figures for on-site generation, the sector generated and consumed about 212 TWh of energy in 2011. This is all energy sitting outside the energy system boundaries. To put these figures into context, it is worth noticing that in 2011 total European electricity production from wind and solar was about 223 TWh.


What would happen if, at a time of excess of electricity supply, the sector would ramp up electricity demand by ad-hoc moving form off to on the grid? It would absorb the peak of cheap electricity supply while maintaining the industrial output unchanged. Meaning more value per kWh, less primary energy consumption, less carbon emissions. In one word: a more competitive industry.


In most cases technology is already available and deployable. For instance, it would be sufficient to install an extra, highly-efficient electric boiler. With the support of additional RDI projects, more options could be envisaged in the near future, whereby electro-technologies could be used in the drying process.


The geographical distributions of mills in Europe allows for cost-effective absorption of excess electricity produced by decentralised energy sources, substantially reducing the need to costly investments in grid extensions.


Last but not least, this cost-effective measure will also reduce the need for additional costs to remunerate unused thermal capacity for electricity generation (so-called Capacity Remuneration Mechanisms – CRM), as the impact of NP RES on the running hours of conventional power plants will be largely mitigated.


Regulatory barriers are the main reason for not making this a reality. Without addressing this aspect first, it will be impossible for any mill operator to start any cost-benefit analysis to assess how to adapt a mill operation in a way that would deliver on-site financial benefits.


1.3 Existing network arrangements
In almost all CEPI countries, existing network arrangements act as a barrier against the absorption of excess supply of electricity.


The only exception is Norway. There, already since 1999, the government promoted the installation of electric boilers on industrial sites (although other incentives were already earlier in place). The rationale was to absorb seasonal excess of hydro electricity generated. The boilers are activated in remote by the network operators.


In exchange for this flexibility, industrial operators have a significant reduction in grid charges. While the usual tariff for the transmission grid (Statnett) is 170 NOK/kW (about 20 €/kW) in 2013, the tariff for flexibility load is 43 NOK/kW (about 5 €/kW). In addition there are distribution charge and taxes. Since 2010 the flexibility grid fee is open for all that can offers to decouple the load either by remote control or at 15 minutes or 2 hour notice.


For customers with remote control, the grid operator can move the load from day to night. The grid operators are very satisfied with this system. The possibility to decouple load has proven to save the grid from collapse. The use of flexible load in periods with excess of electricity stabilizes the grid.
We strongly encourage national regulators to urgently use the Norwegian example as a best practice case for promoting and valuing flexibility markets in their own countries.


2. What do you see as the main barriers to the emergence/functioning of demand-side flexibility? How would you prioritise these?


2.1 Legislative barriers/difficulties
In many cases, the industry is subject to stringent energy efficiency targets. In case of demand side flexibility, deliberately stopping CHP units would negatively impact the industry performance.
To promote energy efficiency programmes while incentivising demand side flexibility, it should be clearly stated in the legislation that importing electricity from the grid would be done in order to absorb
the load from NP RES, such as wind and solar. Therefore the electricity imported should be counted as 100% energy efficient.


2.2 Regulatory barriers/difficulties
This is the key barrier for demand-side flexibility in absorbing excess electricity supply from NP RES.
Currently, network tariffs and network charges (including levies and taxes) are set in a way that discourages industries from accessing the grid.


This approach is in principle correct, as it tends to promote stable and predictable demand from big energy users.


However, in this context, the network operator needs a service to balance the network. A service the industry is ready to provide. But here is the paradox: instead of being remunerated for such a service, industry would have to pay for offering it, to the benefit of the network operator.


In Germany, for instance, should a paper mill decide to import electricity from the grid, it would face additional costs up to more than 70 €/MWh.


Moreover, a mill has a very flat power consumption profile, like i.e. 7000 (or 7500 or 8000) full load hours a year. On this basis, it enjoys a reduced grid fee, i.e. in Germany it pays only 20% (or 15% or 10%) of the normal fee. Normal grid fee depends on local grid operator and might be between 5 to 11 €/MWh. When taking additional load from the grid, the profile will no longer be flat and the 7000 hours threshold might not be reached anymore. As a consequence, the mill would have to pay the remaining 80 to 90% of the grid fee.


A proper regulatory framework should incentivise both the “off-the-grid” baseload demand, and the flexibility to bring “on-the-grid” ad hoc electricity demand to help matching the excess of electricity generation from NP RES.


2.3 Market barriers/difficulties
It should be clear that RES balancing is not an industry prerogative. Industry can be part of the solution, and is willing to do so, provided there is a business case supporting it.
Industry lacks crucial information to build a proper business case. There should be some sort of guarantee on the minimum yearly number of hours one should reasonably expect to be called for balancing the market.


This minimum number of hours should be provided by the regulator and/or network operator and should be the founding element of any contractual agreement.


Moreover, commodity prices will have to be extremely low (or even negative) to compensate for the loss of revenues from CHP/green certificates or other support schemes. In fact, if commodity prices
would be on the level of the fuel used normally, it would just be equal costs for steam generation, but no compensation for lost electricity generation.


Energy supply contracts may need to be adapted to incorporate this additional flexibility.


3. For each of the barriers identified above, please describe the most important 'preconditions' necessary for the emergence/functioning of demand-side flexibility
To promote demand side flexibility in absorbing excess of NP RES supply, the following minimum preconditions would be required:


- Removal of regulatory barriers to create extra demand for electricity at a time of need: no extra costs (tariffs, levies, taxes) when participating in DSF programmes


- Maintain current incentives for on-site generation


- DSF to be compatible with energy efficiency targets: 100% energy efficiency for electricity taken from the grid when participating in DSF programmes


- Need for regulators/network operators to guarantee a minimum yearly amount of hours a paper mill should reasonably expect to be called when participating in DSF programmes.


Lastly, participation in DSF programmes would require significant changes in the way industry operates, both from a technological and industrial processes perspective. Support for Research, Development and Innovation would be needed.


For more information, please contact Nicola Rega at n.rega@cepi.org

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29 Nov.2013

The new EN643

EN 643 is the European List of Standard Grdes of Paper and Board for Recycling. Revised in 2013, the new text includes several major improvements, including a grade-specific tolerance level for non-paper component and more detailed descriptions per grade. CEPI advises all organisations and individuals involved in trade with paper and board for recycling to implement and use the updated standard.

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The CEPI guidance document

We launched a guidance document that details the changes in the revised EN643, to give advice to sellers and buyers of paper for recycling. The guidance was first launched at European Paper Week in English, but is already available in French and Portuguese. Other languages may follow.

English version

Portuguese version

 French version

We have also prepared a summary one-pager and a power point presentation(in English).

A webinar detaling the changes in the revised standard was organised in December 2013: The video recording is available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tISOY39D3k (length=1hour)

We also prepared the following video giving the most important reasons for using the guidance:

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The updated EN643 standard

The updated EN643 standard is now available on the national standardisation websites below:

   
Link Link Link  Link Link Link Link Link Link Link
 (EN)  (EN)  (DE, EN)  (DE, EN) (EN, FR, NL) (FR) (EN) (EN) (EN) (EN)

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Responsible Management of Recovered Paper: Guidelines on reponsible sourcing and quality control

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28 Nov.2013

New CEPI Sustainability report

CEPI launched their latest sustainability report at the European Paper Week in Brussels. The report results verify the exceptional concurrence of sustainability and competitiveness in the European pulp and paper industry. The industry is exemplary in creating value “made in Europe”, focusing on innovation and resource efficiency, while advancing the bioeconomy.

Read the press release for more details.

Download the full version in pdf here and the summary version here.

Find all the graphs and charts of the report here.

Download a powerpoint presentation of the report here.

CEPI Directors and Managers talk about Sustainability in the Paper Industry.

 

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05 Nov.2013 ,

WBCSD Press Release: Global Forest Products Companies Come Together to Support Forest Certification

In an unprecedented show of support from the private sector for forest certification, 26 of the world’s leading companies along the forest products value chain released a leadership statement today, committing to significantly scale up sustainable forest management.

These 26 members of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) Forest Solutions Group (FSG) are responsible for nearly 40% of annual global forest, paper and packaging sales, and are aware that the business sector plays a major role in transforming forest challenges into forest-based opportunities and solutions.

The FSG’s Leadership Statement on the Value and Future of Forest Certification and accompanying technical brief, issued at the WBCSD’s Council Week in Istanbul, recognizes that reducing forest loss and degradation is a global societal priority requiring immediate and concerted action.

“With today’s statement and commitments, the FSG aims to demonstrate leadership in addressing the world’s need for increased sustainable management of natural forests and plantations, as well as wiser use and reuse of forest products,” said FSG co-chair José Luciano Penido, Chairman of Brazil-based Fibria.

In order to ensure that the supply of independently-verified sustainable wood and other forest products continues to increase to meet growing demand, all 26 FSG member companies commit to:

  • Work with stakeholders to spread sustainable forest management;
  • Support and promote the expansion of forest certification;
  • Set 2020 targets to increase the use of certification when sourcing forest products and fiber;
  • Grow markets for certified forest products.

“To meet increasing global demand, we need to expand forest management practices in ways that maintain their growth and vitality, while protecting ecosystems, biodiversity, and livelihoods,” said FSG co-chair Riikka Joukio, Senior Vice President of Finland-based Metsä Group.

Forest certification is a voluntary, market-focused mechanism, which supports a broad range of social, economic and environmental benefits associated with sustainable forest management, yet according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), only 10% of the world’s forests are independently certified.

“The FSG’s leadership statement calls on all stakeholders to join forces to innovate and grow markets for sustainably-produced forest products. Approaches to expand reach and impact of existing certification standards should better address the needs of small forest owners, community forestry, indigenous peoples and agroforestry operators,” said James Griffiths, Managing Director at the WBCSD.

Today’s leadership statement, endorsed by all 26 FSG member companies, is available on the WBCSD website.

FSG core members:
Ahlstrom, Altri, APRIL, Empresas CMPC, Fibria, Grupo Portucel Soporcel, International Paper, Metsä Group, Mondi Group, MWV, SCA, SCG Paper, StoraEnso, Suzano Pulp and Paper, UPM, Weyerhaeuser

FSG associate members:
Andritz, AkzoNobel, Evonik Industries, Kimberly-Clark, Metso, Proctor & Gamble, Pöyry, PricewaterhouseCoopers, SC Johnson and Unilever

 

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