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European Forest Growth 2005-2015

European forests have been growing by over 1,500 football pitches every day! These are other facts by Two Sides here.

 

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New Horizon 2020 project on separate collection. Website to be launched soon!

 

Keep Me Posted EU

The campaign about the citizen's right to choose. See more here

 

Paper and Packaging – How Life Unfolds™

A US national-wide campaign on paper: http://www.howlifeunfolds.com/

 

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19 Apr.2016 ,

Reaction to the tiered approach to carbon leakage protection

The signatories (see below), energy-intensive industries express concerns regarding the so called “tiered approach” to carbon leakage protection under the EU ETS

The tiered approach1 would reserve free allowances for some sectors at the expense of others. It goes against the principle set in the October European Council Conclusions that best performing companies in ETS carbon leakage sectors should not bear further carbon costs. Indeed, it would ensure that even best performers in most sectors would bear significant carbon costs and expose them deliberately to carbon and investment leakage.

The proposed tiering has no environmental or economic justification and is based on flawed assumptions (“cost pass-through”) of in reality unpredictable market dynamics. Depriving sectors of carbon leakage provisions would not deliver decarbonisation through investment and innovation. Moreover, it could well prove to have been entirely unnecessary. All forecasts, including the Commission’s Impact Assessment, predict that there will be sufficient allowances available to ensure full free allocation to benchmark levels at least until 2025: and there are other proposals for ETS reform that would deliver full and effective carbon leakage protection without the need for arbitrary discrimination.

To that end, we continue to support an approach based on realistic benchmarks, allocation based on more recent production data and an adequate reserve that ensures full allocation to benchmark levels. The proposed share of allowances to be auctioned shall also be recalculated downwards, as analysis of the EC proposal shows, it does not properly include the number of allowances which were to be given out for free (i.a. unallocated and left-over NER allowances).

In the circumstances, the “tiered approach” would introduce an unnecessary and unfair discrimination between sectors. Fairness and solidity should become key principles of policy making. Jobs in one sector are neither more nor less important than those in other sectors. The signatories fully share and support the BusinessEurope views on tiered approach as expressed in a statement on April 14th.

We ask you to create a framework that gives all sectors an equal opportunity to compete and thrive in Europe, and not to pick certain sectors to stay in Europe. It would undermine our industry’s faith in, and support for, the ETS as a means of reducing carbon emissions.

For further information please contact Peter Botschek, Cefic Director Energy & HSSE, e-mail pbo@cefic.be

1 i.e. as presented in a Non-paper on a Tiered Carbon Leakage List in Phase IV of EU ETS (authored by France, the United Kingdom)

 

 

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04 Apr.2016

Joint declaration by a group of industry associations “2016, time to deliver… an ambitious power market reform”

The signatories of this declaration gather leading associations and industry groups with a clear stake in Europe’s energy policy. We share the conviction that only a flexible and dynamic energy system, making the best use of innovative and distributed supply and demand options, can ensure a cost-efficient and sustainable transition towards a decarbonised energy system.


We strongly believe that a market-driven environment is the best means to provide long-term investment signals while meeting all system needs and accommodating the growing share of renewable energy in the energy mix. The completion of the Internal Energy Market will improve system adequacy and efficiency, increase security of supply, support the competitiveness of European industry, and help deliver the energy and climate goals stemming from the COP 21 agreement and EU’s post 2020 objectives on emissions reductions, energy efficiency and renewables.


However, we see many constraints persisting in the energy sector that affect investment decisions, in particular: 1) depressed wholesale market prices due to overcapacity; 2) fading EU-coordination of energy policies with a tendency towards renationalisation; and 3) an antiquated set of market rules.


Market rules have been tailored to centralised production within national boundaries for too long. Not only have they failed to adapt to developments in energy technologies and evolution of demand patterns both at industry and end-consumer level, but some of them hamper the deployment of renewables, storage and demand-side flexibility. These new technologies can today provide valuable services including balancing energy offering significant flexibility to the system.


The energy system is now more complex to plan, control and balance. It needs enhanced flexibility that could be provided by a mix of options, but this would require significant changes in the relevant legislation. In this respect, we consider the upcoming legislative package on market design as a unique chance to provide the energy sector with a predictable investment framework, fairer market conditions, and ultimately seize new opportunities arising from decentralised energy production and demand side participation.


In particular, we deem essential that any ambitious reform of the energy market addresses the following issues:


1. Providing adequate price signals and further integration of short-term markets across borders
2. Ensuring a balanced approach to system adequacy that fully takes into account the contribution from renewable energy supply and demand sources
3. Implementing a level playing field for all flexibility providers to foster the pan-European trading ofelectricity and grid support services.


1. Providing adequate price signals and further integration of short-markets across borders
In a well-functioning electricity market, unhindered price-formation drives operational choices and investment decisions. Transparent and undistorted market prices must be in place in all time horizons, and allowed to move freely without caps. Wholesale electricity prices reflecting scarcity would signal the need for investments in new capacity. Therefore, price spikes should be treated as a positive sign of an efficient and cost-effective energy system where market participants are free to choose the level of hedging they prefer to contract, revealing the true value of flexibility and energy at all times.
Market rules also need to be adapted so as to enhance clean and flexible energy providers to trade power over broader geographical areas and as close as possible to the time of delivery. In this context, the opening and cross-border integration of intraday market is essential, especially for energy producers whose output is variable. A as long as separate procurement of balancing capacity and energy is guaranteed, another important aspect is the possibility to negotiate the duration of contracts, e.g. for balancing contracts. This is crucial, as certain flexibility technologies may require considerable capital investment and, therefore, contracts with a longer duration.


2. Ensuring a balanced approach to system adequacy that fully takes into account the contribution from different energy sources


The main challenge for security of electricity supply is not the availability of capacity as such, but the availability of flexibility that is needed to support the system and provide for a constant balance between supply and demand.
In order to identify potential, locally constrained adequacy issues, system adequacy assessments should be carried out according to a common methodology and metrics transparently defined in EU legislation1. Such analysis should be performed at regional level and consider the potential of all flexibility options, from the various energy supply and demand sources. This would ensure a rigorously needs-based approach to the introduction of Capacity Remuneration Mechanisms (CRMs) when the market cannot not deliver the adequate flexibility.
If CRMs are deemed necessary, they should be designed in a way that minimises any negative impacts on price formation on energy markets. They should avoid contributing to continued overcapacity situation by keeping redundant and polluting power plants online, and prioritise clean flexibility options as foreseen in the energy state aid guidelines.


3. Implementing a level playing field for all flexibility providers2 to foster the pan-European trading of electricity and grid support services

In addition to the modernisation and further opening of the balancing market, a proper market for ancillary or grid support services needs to be fostered to provide additional non-discriminatory revenue streams to flexibility providers, as well as overall operating cost savings for the energy system. As of today, a number of services and solutions from decentralised generation and demand-side response are technically feasible, but current market conditions do not properly value their commercial provision.
The continued adaptation of balancing and ancillary services markets should foster liquidity and incorporate innovative and decentralised solutions. Prohibitive pre-qualification requirements and access conditions for independent aggregators, extended product-durations or minimum thresholds and symmetric bids are some of the aspects currently hampering an effective market. Moreover, contradictory regulatory signals, e.g. regarding network tariffs, the operation of industrial loads or co-generation should be addressed to ensure demand side flexibility further develops without impeding the achievement of robust energy efficiency targets.

1 Incl. a clear system adequacy target level for all control areas in the EU as many countries are lacking one
2 “A service provided by a network user to the energy system by changing its generation and/or consumption patterns in response to an external signal” (Task Force Smart Grids report, 2015)in

 

 

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31 Mar.2016 ,

EU ETS: Three reasons why the Tiered Approach is bad for the EU economy

The non-paper jointly drafted by the French and British government on tiered free allocation arbitrarily determines which sector has a future in Europe and which sector has a future outside Europe.

Specifically, the proposal has three major critical points:

1. It is unjustified from both an economic and a fairness perspective

The proposal pretends to adequately ensure protection against the risk of carbon leakage. However, it reduces the share of free credits to the vast majority of industrial sectors, without providing any evidence of the impact of additional costs on their competitiveness. The proposal particularly lacks of any cost comparison between a given European and a non-European sector.

The proposal reduces the amount of free credits to certain sectors, as a supposedly fair gesture towards some others who would otherwise receive too little protection. Yet, some other sectors would unjustifiably be excluded from such a “solidarity clause”. This is far from being a fair approach.


2. It penalises competitive industries investing in low-carbon technologies

Protection against the risk of carbon leakage should provide the regulatory certainty for industries in transition towards a low-carbon economy.

However the tiered approach rewards the most carbon intensive and least profitable sectors. This is intrinsic in the formula used, which rewards high carbon intensity combined with low value added (GVA).

On the contrary, the formula punishes a sector investing in carbon emission reductions by giving a lower protection against the risk of carbon leakage as a direct consequence of these investments.


3. It hampers innovation

The ETS is expected to ultimately promote the substitution of high-carbon with low-carbon production. In this respect, solutions may come from within a given sector or as a cross-fertilisation of ideas coming from other sectors. One example is the potential coming from the bioeconomy or circular economy to provide solutions to decarbonise other sectors.

However, the proposed tiered approach provides different carbon cost exposure to different sectors, with the paradox that the most carbon intensive will bear the least carbon costs. As a consequence, the investment signal from the ETS will be totally jeopardised.

Sectors which successfully invest in decarbonising their processes are systematically at risk of being pushed outside the EU.

 


Alternatives to the tiered approach

Discussions on tiered free allocation are triggered by the need to avoid the application of the Cross-Sectoral Correction Factor (CSCF). The timing and magnitude of the CSCF are far from being certain, as it depends on a combination of factors (production levels, changes in the market, technological developments, innovation, development of international carbon markets, etc.).

Rather than picking one scenario and fixing the rules for the next 15 years accordingly, the EU should:

1. Define a regulatory framework that stimulates and rewards investments in low-carbon technologies, as a way to reduce the demand for free credits;

2. Support programmes to accelerate the market-readiness of breakthrough technologies for industrial installations;

3. Secure a sufficient amount of free credits to allow for low-carbon economic growth in energy intensive industries exposed to international competition;

4. Set rules to predictably assess potential shortages in the supply of free credits and, when the case, explore all possible options to preserve industrial competitiveness.


For more information, please contact Nicola Rega at n.rega@cepi.org mobile: +32(0)485403412.

 

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26 Feb.2016 ,

EUTR implementation report fails to tackle loophole on printed products

CEPI, together with INTERGRAF (European Federation for Print and Digital Communication) published a press release commenting on the implementation report of the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR) published by the European Commission last week. Judging it as a missed opportunity, the two associations are disappointed that the inclusion of printed products is not recommended strongly enough in the regulation’s scope. CEPI and INTERGRAF urge the Commission once again to amend the annex of the EUTR and include products under the chapter 49 of the Combined Nomenclature. The non-inclusion of printed products will lead to circumvention. There is a risk that illegally-logged wood will be traded to countries with less stringent legal rules, before being traded to the EU.

Read our press release.

Read more about the EU Timber Regulation on the Commission website.

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03 Dec.2015 ,

European paper industry's views on the Circular Economy package

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) welcomes the long-awaited Circular Economy package that was launched by the European Commission. By recognising the contribution of biomass and bio-based products to the Circular Economy the European Commission now takes into account that circularity in many cases starts with raw materials from renewable sources. CEPI is looking forward to concrete actions in the field of bio-based product in the future. In addition, the European Commission has recognised the importance of ending waste management options that do not create value for Europe. CEPI also believes that the Commission is right in recognising recyclability as waste prevention and in harmonising the method for the calculation of recycling rates to make data more comparable and reliable. The European paper industry, together with its partners in the paper value chain, is about to publish the European Declaration on Paper Recycling committing to a further increase in paper recycling from today’s already high 71,7% paper recycling rate.

Read the full press release here.

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19 Nov.2015 ,

European Paper Week 2015

European Paper Week, CEPI's annual event, was very successful and marked a record number of attendance. More than 400 industry representatives gathered in Brussels for three intensive days and left full of inspiring ideas, new contacts and good memories.

Never before did European Paper Week bring together such a large number of prominent speakers. With Industry 4.0 being the overriding theme of the event, the keynote speaker was renowned economist Jeremy Rifkin, author of 20 books about the impact of scientific and technological changes on the economy, the workforce, society, and the environment. In an energetic dialogue with Commissioner Vice-President Maroš Sefcovic, he presented his theory of the Zero Marginal Cost Society via a live video link from the United States. You can listen to Mr. Rifkin's speech here and Mr. Sefcovic's here.

Commissioner for Digital Economy & Society, Günther Oettinger, gave the Commission’s view on Industry 4.0 and the future of industry in Europe, while Commissioner for Agriculture and Rural Development, Phil Hogan, joined the dinner and congratulated outgoing Chairman Gary McGann.

European Paper Week also celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Forest-based Sector Technology Platform. European Commissioner Carlos Moedas, responsible for Research, Science and Innovation, congratulated the Platform for its achievements.

You can view all presentations, photos and other materials published during EPW at: http://www.cepi.org/EPW/2015

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15 Oct.2015 ,

Polish primary school and Finnish university win 2015 paper recycling awards

Yesterday, the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) announced the winners of the fifth European Paper Recycling awards. The well-attended ceremony took place at the European Parliament and was hosted by MEP Eva Kaili who is also head of the Greek S&D delegation.


The winner of the Technology Improvement and R&D category was Aalto University and VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) with a new, innovative process for turning paper for recycling and cardboard into textile fibres called Ioncell-F.


Although producing textile fibres from cellulosic material is nothing new, the process submitted by Aalto University and VTT is innovative in two ways. Firstly, it allows for the production of fibres of quality equal or better than those deriving from similar processes. Their high strength also renders the fibres suitable as natural reinforcement in composite materials. Secondly, the process makes it possible to use lignin as a natural textile dye.


The Ioncell-F process is based on the use of a so-called ionic liquid to dissolve cellulosic waste material without the addition of toxic chemicals and spin fibres for the production of textiles and garments. “We’re happy to see this environmentally-friendly process already attracting considerable interest, even though it is still in a developmental phase”, said Michael Hummel, Postdoctoral researcher at Aalto University.


The winner of the Information and Education category was the Literatura za Makulature (Literature for Paper for Recycling) project, submitted by a primary school in the Tychy region of Poland. In order to encourage children to get involved in paper recycling, the school invited famous Polish authors to meet its pupils, paying for their participation with money raised from selling the paper for recycling brought to school by the children. The initiative is unique not only in Tychy but in Poland.
In his speech ERPC Chairman Henri Vermeulen stressed the role of the recycling awards. “It is our pleasure to highlight and reward innovative paper recycling projects coming from education institutions. Initiatives like these prove that the paper industry is already the perfect example of a circular economy”, he added.


Five more entries were commended by the jury: Ecofolio for their project ‘The Modulated Eco-Contribution Scale’, Papierenkarton.nlz o.o. for their ‘Papier & Karton Educational Programme’ (Information and Education category); PTS Papiertechnische Stiftung for ‘Advanced treatment of recycled pulp by use of hydrodynamic cavitation pulses’, Alucha & SCA Hygiene Products for ‘REFILLS (Recovering of Energy and FILLers from Sludge)’ and Kadant International for ‘Polycup recycling at James Cropper speciality papers’ (Technology Improvement and R&D category).


Photos from the awards and presentations given by the winners are available at www.paperforrecycling.eu/recycling-awards. The next edition of the ERPC recycling awards will be organised in 2017. For more information, please contact the ERPC Secretariat, Ulrich Leberle, at +32 2 627 49 23, +32 479 90 59 21 or erpc@cepi.org.

 

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15 Oct.2015

Polish primary school and Finnish university win 2015 paper recycling awards

Yesterday, the European Recovered Paper Council (ERPC) announced the winners of the fifth European Paper Recycling awards. The well-attended ceremony took place at the European Parliament and was hosted by MEP Eva Kaili who is also head of the Greek S&D delegation.


The winner of the Technology Improvement and R&D category was Aalto University and VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) with a new, innovative process for turning paper for recycling and cardboard into textile fibres called Ioncell-F.


Although producing textile fibres from cellulosic material is nothing new, the process submitted by Aalto University and VTT is innovative in two ways. Firstly, it allows for the production of fibres of quality equal or better than those deriving from similar processes. Their high strength also renders the fibres suitable as natural reinforcement in composite materials. Secondly, the process makes it possible to use lignin as a natural textile dye.

The winner of the Information and Education category was the Literatura za Makulature (Literature for Paper for Recycling) project, submitted by a primary school in the Tychy region of Poland. In order to encourage children to get involved in paper recycling, the school invited famous Polish authors to meet its pupils, paying for their participation with money raised from selling the paper for recycling brought to school by the children. The initiative is unique not only in Tychy but in Poland.


Five more entries were commended by the jury: Ecofolio for their project ‘The Modulated Eco-Contribution Scale’, Papierenkarton.nlz o.o. for their ‘Papier & Karton Educational Programme’ (Information and Education category); PTS Papiertechnische Stiftung for ‘Advanced treatment of recycled pulp by use of hydrodynamic cavitation pulses’, Alucha & SCA Hygiene Products for ‘REFILLS (Recovering of Energy and FILLers from Sludge)’ and Kadant International for ‘Polycup recycling at James Cropper speciality papers’ (Technology Improvement and R&D category).

More information:

  1. Press release announcing the winners
  2. Photos of the winners (more are coming soon!)
  3. Short description of the winners and commended entries



 

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14 Oct.2015

Freight Stakeholders call for open dialogue on wagonload services

CEFIC, CEPI, CER, CLECAT, EFIP, ESC, ESPO and UIP have issued a  joint paper on wagonload.

According to them, this segment of rail freight is at risk of disappearing. With this paper, the associations would like to recall the urgency of taking action to prevent wagonload services from further declining.

While market-driven solutions are crucial, policy intervention and support is also needed. In this respect, there should be a strong cooperation with Member States, ports, regional and local authorities towards implementing the most appropriate solutions, including best practices.

The associations would like to start an open dialogue on the need to revitalise wagonload services and in particular rail freight at the last mile, recognising that each actor in the supply-chain has the responsibility to consider solutions reflecting the business and meeting the needs of our (end) customers. This document can be read as a starting point for further dialogue and action at policy and operational levels.

 

 

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01 Oct.2015 ,

Gary McGann awarded Global CEO of the year

CEPI is happy to announce that its Chairman Gary McGann has been awarded the PPI's Global CEO of the year award. Earlier this year he was awarded the European CEO of the year award for the second year running.

The PPI Awards honor leadership, vision, innovation and strategic accomplishments within the pulp and paper industry, and are the only global awards dedicated to recognising the achievements of companies, mills and individuals in the sector. The winners were announced at the awards dinner on September 28th in Chicago, IL at the InterContinental Hotel.

Entries were evaluated by three panels of judges who independently reviewed the entries against the award criteria set out in each category.

To find out more, go to http://www.ppiawards.com/
 

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